Course Descriptions

  • Courses are listed by discipline.
  • 100-level courses are generally designed for first-year students; 200-level courses are generally designed for second-year students.
  • Many courses are offered only once in an academic year, either Fall or Spring semester pending sufficient enrollment.
  • Many courses have prerequisites that are either other college courses, developmental courses, or satisfactory scores on the basic skills assessment.

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Accounting Credits
ACC110
Personal and Small Business Taxes

Students learn the kinds of taxes that an individual or small business must report to federal and state governments. Income taxes are the primary focus and students learn to apply the method and principles of tax preparation using a computerized tax preparation software package.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ACC111
Accounting I with Computer Applications

Introduction to the accounting cycle: recording transactions, posting to ledgers, preparing work sheets and financial statements. Includes: special journals, inventory valuation, receivables, payables and interest on notes. A hands-on introduction to computerized accounting solving selected problems using general ledger software including QuickBooks. This is the first course of a two-course series (ACC111 and ACC112) intended for A.S. Business Administration concentrations covering the topics of Financial Accounting.

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025) and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ACC112
Accounting II with Computer Applications

This course continues ACC111 covering liabilities, long-term assets and sources of equity in partnerships, corporations, and proprietorships. Analysis of accounting information is also covered. Computerized accounting including QuickBooks and Peachtree are used for selected problems as well as the completion of a computerized practice set. This is the second course of a two-course series (ACC111 and ACC112) intended for A.S. Business Administration concentrations covering the topics of Financial Accounting.

Prerequisite: (ACC111 or ACC101) and (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ACC115
Payroll Accounting

Payroll Accounting provides an understanding of the laws that affect a company's payroll structure and practical application skills in maintaining payroll records. Topics covered include: payroll tax laws, payroll tax forms, payroll and personnel records, computing wages and salaries, taxes affecting employees and employers, analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions and completing various federal and state forms. Students prepare business payroll in both a manual and computer format.

Prerequisite: ACC111 or ACC201

Offered: Varies

3
ACC201
Financial Accounting

Students learn principles of financial accounting with emphasis on service and merchandising businesses. Topics include: the accounting cycle, recording transactions, adjusting accounts and preparing financial statements, inventory valuation, depreciation methods, disposal of assets, receivables, liabilities, investments, and interpreting financial statements of proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. This is a transfer level course in Financial Accounting intended for the Associate in Arts student.

Prerequisite: (BUS100 or HRM140) and GIT110 and (MAT030 or MAT035) and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ACC202
Managerial Accounting

Students learn managerial accounting concepts applied to a variety of businesses with emphasis on job order costing, process costing, cost allocation and cost-volume profit analysis. The budgeting process is examined using master budgets and planning, flexible budgets with standard costs and variances, capital budgets and managerial decisions.

Prerequisite: ACC201 or ACC111 and ACC112

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ACC221
Intermediate Accounting I

Refinement of principles. Special valuation problems on cash, receivables, inventories, investments, and other assets.

Prerequisite: ACC202 or ACC105

 

3
ACC222
Intermediate Accounting II

Continues ACC221. Special valuation problems in liabilities and equity, such as interest method in bonds, leases, and cash-flow statements.

Prerequisite: ACC221

3
ACC263
The VITA Practicum

This Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) practicum provides an opportunity for students to perform a community service in cooperation with the Internal Revenue Service and the Massachusetts Department of Revenue. The course trains students to assist taxpayers in filling out tax returns. Students also staff centers on Cape Cod, helping local residents complete their tax returns.

Prerequisite: ACC101 or ACC111 or ACC201

Co-requisite: ACC110 (may be taken concurrently)

Offered: Spring

3
American Sign Language Credits
ASL101
American Sign Language I

An introductory-level course in American Sign Language intended to give an overview of both the language and the culture of the Deaf community. The course focuses on everyday interaction, frequently used signs, basic rules of grammar, and cultural features within the Deaf community.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ASL102
American Sign Language II

The continued study of American Sign Language with emphasis on increasing vocabulary usage both receptively and expressively. A detailed look into the grammar and structure of American Sign Language with continued exposure to Deaf culture.

Prerequisite: ASL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
Anthropology Credits
ANT107
Introduction to Anthropology

This is an introduction to the principles and procedures of anthropology. The course is divided into two main areas: Physical Anthropology, which covers the physical nature of humans and the evolution of this nature; and Cultural Anthropology, which covers the cultural nature of humans including the origin and development of social institutions.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ANT108
World Archaeology

This introduction to world prehistory traces our shared human past from the emergence of human material culture to the rise and establishment of ancient states and empires. Special attention devoted to the study of the early civilizations of Western Asia, Europe, China, India, Africa, and the Americas provides for the understanding of how and why the various continents developed their unique civilizations. Archaeological discoveries provide the basis and background for this study.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
ANT211
Comparative Cultures

This course provides an in-depth examination of selected contemporary societies focusing on their customs, language, values, key social institutions and stratification systems. The various internal and external forces affecting political, economic, religious and social cultural dynamics in different, distinct cultures are examined. Students explore the differing social relationships within the family and the community in selected societies. The course also provides a review of selected anthropological case studies from many world cultures.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or ANT107

Offered: Varies

Note: This course satasfies the Behavioral or Social Science General Education requirement.

3
ANT215
People & Cultures of Middle East

This course is an overview of the cultures of the contemporary Middle East. Emphasis is placed on understanding the region’s cultural, social, political, and religious diversity. Popular and academic conceptions (and misconceptions) of the region are examined and a general history of the region is introduced in order to develop an anthropological perspective on the contemporary culture as observed in the villages, towns, cities, and nations of the region.

Prerequisite: ANT107 or SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
Arabic Credits
ARB100
Conversational Arabic

This basic conversational Arabic course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of Arabic to the basic skills necessary to developing a working knowledge of spoken Arabic. The emphasis is on listening, speaking, and understanding spoken Arabic.

Prerequisite: satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ARB122
Immersion Study in Arabic Language and Civilization

Students study spoken Arabic language and civilization in an Arabic speaking country. Traditional class work is supplemented by field trips and cultural activities.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: January Intersession

3
Art Credits
ART100
Drawing I

Students apply various graphic approaches that may include drawing from still life, landscape, and human figure. Emphasis is on individual creative expression with the objective being the development of perception and understanding of natural phenomena and translation of this information to a two-dimensional surface. Examples of contemporary drawing are appraised in the context of diversity and cultural differences.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART101
Design I

Basic design elements including line, shape, color, texture, value, and composition and their integration on a two-dimensional surface are studied and applied. Students examine the nature and effect of color in its full utilization as a design element in conjunction with the interaction of positive and negative space, optical phenomena, and theories of harmony and visual dynamics. Cultural, ethical, and environmental influences on design from a global perspective will be understood.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART103
Painting I

This is an introductory course in painting, exploring a variety of approaches and painting media. A series of landscape, still life, and personal imagery paintings are investigated as both descriptive and imaginative forms of creative expression. The ethical, multicultural and international contributions of painting are evaluated.

Prerequisite: ART100

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART109
Art Appreciation

This course provides an introduction to the visual arts made by cultures throughout the world from prehistory to the present. It includes European art as well as art from Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on how and why art is created, its nature, and the role it plays in society. By studying the fundamental principles, elements, techniques, styles, and vocabulary of art, students explore significant artistic creations ranging in character from the personal, to the political, and religious. Students are required to make an independent visit to a museum.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART125
History of Art: Stone Age to Gothic

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to the art of the western world from the magical creations of the Old Stone Age to the magnificent works of the Gothic era. Illustrated lectures deal with such topics as ideas guiding artistic creations, general stylistic trends, important methods, materials, and techniques used.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART130
You Can Design!

An online introduction to understanding and interpreting the world around you for the purpose of creating art work. Recognizing and identifying elements of visual language like Line, Shape, Color, Texture, and Tone will lead to applying these elements in the creation of art and design work. Critically evaluating art work and the work of other artists and designers will help nurture confidence in the use of visual language and provide a basis for exploring all forms of visual expression, including drawing, painting, life drawing, sculpture, design, graphic art, website design and printmaking.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

1
ART134
Art History: Renaissance to Modern

Students explore the art of the western world from the Renaissance to the Modern eras. Illustrated lectures cover general aesthetic trends, the life and work of key artists, ideas guiding their creations, the vocabulary of art, as well as important methods, materials, and techniques the artists have employed. Significant artistic creations ranging in character from the personal, to the political, and religious are examined. Students are required to make an independent visit to a museum.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies the Humanities & Fine Arts General Education requirement.

3
ART135
Fashion, Textile and Fiber Arts

Students investigate and develop various approaches to fiber art, using traditional and non- traditional materials. Various techniques are applied with an emphasis on creative expression.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
ART136
Three-Dimensional Design

This course is an introduction to the elements of visual language (line, shape, tone, texture, color, light, volume, negative space) in 3D form. Students solve 3D design problems by creating modeled and constructed forms both in relief and free-standing form. Historical references are made to support the development and understanding of the work. This course can inspire students to explore their creative expression in sculpture.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART137
History of Graphic Design

This course critically investigates and explores graphic design and visual communication history, materials, techniques and styles, major movements and significant artists and designers. This course requires students to participate in lecture and presentation, and prepare writing and studio projects. Students build a conceptual and visual understanding of vocabulary, applying critical thinking and visual skills in an evaluation of the historical context and the importance of historical reference in graphic design work.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ART139
Digital Photography

This is an introductory course in digital photography, exploring both digital capture and aspects of Adobe Photoshop®. This course focuses on developing strong photographic skills, creating dynamic images and an online portfolio. Students explore light in relation to photography, relevant aspects of photographic history and contemporary photography.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score. ART214 is recommended

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ART140
Introduction to Silkscreen Printing

Students study elements and apply methods of silkscreen printing. Students create individual printable designs and work on paper and fabric surfaces to create multicolor screen-printed images. Techniques may include a variety of stencil making methods, direct approaches and photo-emulsion.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ART170
Introduction to Computer Graphics (Adobe Photoshop®, Illustrator®, InDesign®)

Students learn software, hardware, and operating system basics using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. This course introduces fundamental concepts and terminology for creating and editing basic electronic images. The student successfully utilize these applications in graphic design, publication design, and preparation of documents for the web.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement

3
ART200
Drawing II

Students explore advanced drawing concepts and techniques including free-hand perspective and rendering techniques as they apply to the representation of natural and man-made forms. Emphasis is placed on drawing the human figure including the nude. Individual style and self-expression are developed.

Prerequisite: ART100

Offered: Spring

3
ART201
Design II

An investigation of a variety of fundamental visual forms and concepts that can be used to delineate and describe both two and three-dimensional structures. The descriptive expressive uses of color will be utilized in conjunction with structural systems that will explore different spatial concerns.

Prerequisite: ART101

Offered: Spring

3
ART205
Illustration (Adobe Illustrator®)

Illustration I (Adobe Illustrator) is a detailed exploration of a variety of drawing, painting and design concepts and techniques using Adobe Illustrator. Development of personal expression is addressed as students use various techniques to illustrate book, poster, periodical and editorial designs.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART207
Graphic Design I

Introduction to the field of graphic design, including typography, layout and general graphic techniques. The use of technology and computational skills are applied in studio projects to support creativity and proficiency in handling media and preparing graphic designs. Ethical principles and concepts in communication design are explored in multicultural and global contexts.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART208
Graphic Design II

This course is a continuation of ART207, which introduces typography, composition, and layout, development of graphic concepts, and problem solving and creative thinking.

Prerequisite: ART207

Offered: Spring

3
ART209
Printmaking Techniques

The study and development of the fundamental elements of printmaking techniques using a variety of approaches to edition and unique printing. Students cover all aspects of plate preparation and printing.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART210
Graphic Production & Layout (Adobe InDesign®)

This course is an introduction to the field of electronic publishing and preparing materials for printed output using modern computer-based technologies. It explores the basics of digital typography and page layout using a professional page layout application to assemble various text-based and graphical elements into cohesive and effective communications using guided and unguided hands-on exercises to produce simple documents. Also covered are the fundamentals of color as they apply to printing. Emphasis is on the mastery of the software and technology.

Prerequisite: ART101 & ART170

Offered: Spring

3
ART213
Myths, Legends and Symbols in Art

In this course, students explore key myths, legends and symbols in the visual arts and the way in which they have been interpreted by artists throughout history. Illustrated lectures will include the study of art works which deal with specific divinities, legendary and mythic figures as well as symbolic elements such as particular flowers, fruit, animals, objects, colors and numbers. Disciplines such as music, literature, drama, or cinema, relating to the topics discussed in class, are incorporated into the course.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

3
ART214
Digital Imaging I (Adobe Photoshop®)

This introductory course covers Adobe Photoshop software and scanning techniques and their relationship to graphic design. Students learn from hands-on projects the features of Adobe Photoshop. Assignments are tailored to a wide variety of users from graphic designers, artists, photographers, and web page designers. From the first pixel to the finished picture, students gain imaging proficiency and a strong understanding of the program.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART216
Life Drawing

Through the use of traditional and contemporary drawing media and methods, students explore gesture, modeling, anatomy, tonality, form, composition, and other aspects of figurative study through observation of clothed and/or unclothed live models.

Prerequisite: ART100

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ART218
Typography

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of typography. Students demonstrate how to utilize type to solve visual problems in graphic design and visual communication. Students are taught typographic structures and terminology for visual problem solving. This course uses both computer and hands-on methods to address the language of type and its effective usage. By studying the language of type through its history and by its application, students gain strong working knowledge of this essential element in graphic design.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART219
Portfolio Preparation for Artists and Graphic Designers

This course covers preparing, critiquing, and presenting a portfolio utilizing existing, personal art work. The portfolio of work will be used primarily to support the students transfer to art school. Other topics include writing a resume and cover letter and creating an artist’s statement. Students are expected to have finished artwork for a portfolio.

Prerequisite: ART100 and ART101

Offered: Spring

1
ART226
Printmaking II

This course enables students to continue the study of printmaking and further develop their ideas through the exploration of advanced techniques and concepts. The class uses a variety of approaches to edition and unique print. Students explore collagraph, woodcut, solar etching, and polymer lithography. Students become proficient in all aspects of plate preparation and printing using professional printmaking inks.

Prerequisites: ART209

Semester Offered: Spring

3
ART229
Painting II

Painting II provides an in depth study of painting including color theory, and composition with an emphasis on developing self-expression. The course will continue exploring a variety of genres from observational realism to abstraction. Critical analysis of contemporary artistic movements will help students to become familiar with a variety of styles, find their own personal “aesthetic language”, and develop their ability to work with acrylic media.

Prerequisite: ART103

Semester Offered: Spring

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
ART230
Design and the Book

This course will explore a variety of techniques and concepts to make hand-made books. Topics may include organizations, sequence, layout, design, development of content, and bookbinding techniques. Students develop content with photography, printmaking, and computer generated images. Students explore paper making techniques and make paper for their books.

Prerequisite: ART101

Semester Offered: Varies

3
ART256
Internship in Graphic Design

This course is designed to provide a practical experience in a professional graphic arts setting and preparation for a successful career in the graphic design field. Designation of intern site is based on student academic and career goals. The student works in a graphic design business for 150 hours.

Prerequisite: ART205, ART207, ART210 and ART214

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
ART257
Art Gallery & Exhibition Management

This course offers an introduction to galleries and their management with both theoretical and practical experience. Students learn about public and private galleries and the acquisition, care, study, and diffusion of objects. It is designed as a hands-on experience working exclusively in CCCC Higgins Art Gallery. The course introduces the student to careers in art practice, gallery and exhibition management. The student gains theoretical and practical experience in the field of display methods, design and management. Class includes 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of gallery work. Work scheduled hours appropriate to the demands of the gallery setting.

Prerequisite: One 3-credit Art course

Offered: Varies

3
Astronomy Credits
AST101
Fundamentals of Astronomy

A one-semester science course, with laboratory, that provides an introduction to the principles and theories of contemporary astronomy within and beyond the solar system. The course traces the pathways of observation, conjecture, thought, investigation and discovery to demonstrate how scientific inquiry has enabled the human mind to attain an unprecedented insight to the nature of the universe. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

3
AST201
Current Topics in Astronomy

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore various topics of current interest in astronomy, adding breadth and depth to their knowledge of the cosmos and building independent research and presentation skills. Most course materials will be drawn from highly credible sources on the Internet (for example NASA.GOV) and current astronomical publications.

Prerequisite: AST101 or PHY101 or PHY211

Offered: Varies

3
Aviation Maintenance Technology Credits
AMT101
Aviation Maintenance Technology (AMT): General Module 1

General AMT Module 1 for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Advisory Circular Part 147-3B. General AMT Module 1 introduces students to the applications of mathematics in aviation, basic physics, Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), aircraft drawings, aircraft weight & balance, aircraft materials & processes, and basic electricity.

Prerequisites: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semester Offered: Varies

6
AMT102
Aviation Maintenance Technology (AMT): General Module 2

General AMT Module 2 for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Advisory Circular Part 147-3B. General AMT Module 2 introduces students to the applications of fluid lines & fittings, ground operations & servicing, cleaning & corrosion control, electrical systems, fuel systems, fire protection systems, and instrument systems.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in AMT101.

Semester Offered: Varies

6
AMT201
Aviation Maintenance Technology: Airframe Module 1

Airframe AMT Module 1 for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFAR) Advisory Circular Part 147-3A. Airframe AMT Module 1 introduces the student to the applications of airframe inspections, landing gear systems, hydraulic & pneumatic systems, cabin atmosphere control, communication/navigations systems, and aircraft position, warning, ice & rain control systems.

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in AMT102.

Semester Offered: Varies

3
AMT202
Aviation Maintenance Technology: Airframe Module 2

Airframe AMT Module 2 for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Advisory Circular Part 147-3A. Airframe AMT Module 2 introduces students to the applications of metallic and non-metallic structures, aircraft coverings, aircraft finishes, aircraft welding, and assemby & rigging.

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in AMT201.

Semester Offered: Varies

3
AMT203
Aviation Maintenance Technology: Powerplant Module 1

Powerplant AMT Module 1 for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Advisory Circular Part 147-3A. Powerplant AMT Module 1 introduces students to the applications of propellers, reciprocating engines, turbine engines/un-ducted fans/auxiliary power unit, Powerplant exhaust/reverser systems and Powerplant inspections.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in AMT102.

Semester Offered: Varies

3
AMT204
Aviation Maintenance Technology: Powerplant Module 2

Powerplant AMT Module 2 for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is required by Advisory Circular Part 147-3A. Powerplant Module 2 introduces students to the applications of aircraft lubricating systems, ignition systems, fuel metering, induction and airflow systems, and power plant cooling systems.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in AMT203.

Semester Offered: Varies

3
Biology Credits
BIO105
Survey: Human Anatomy & Physiology

This is an introductory course of human anatomy and physiology. The course starts with anatomical terms and basic cellular biology and then emphasizes the structure and function of several organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course involves the examination of slides, bones, models, and the dissection of a rat. (This course does not meet the Nursing and Dental Hygiene program requirements for Anatomy and Physiology.) (3 class hours / 2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO109
Survey of Biology

This is a survey course of biology, the study of life, in one semester. It is designed to conceptually and experimentally explore the processes that sustain life. Major topics include cell biology, adaptation and evolution, genetics and reproduction, ecology and diversity, taxonomy and classification. The course is not intended for science majors.

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO151
General Biology I

This first course in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students is designed to acquaint the student with foundational principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function. Topics covered will include the basic chemical properties of living things, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression and Mendelian genetics. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisites: MAT045 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores. Co-requisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO152
General Biology II

The second in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. It is designed to acquaint the student with the evolution and diversity of life as well as general ecological principles. Prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotes, plants, fungi and animals are studied. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. Microscopy, dissection, and some field work provide the basis for learning. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in BIO101 or BIO151

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO161
The Microbial World

An introduction to microorganisms and the roles they play in our environment and our bodies, for non-science majors. The topics covered include the different types of microbes, their cell structure, function, ecology, physiology and genetics. An introduction will be given to applied microbiology including the fields of agricultural, food, industrial and medical microbiology and of microbial ecology. The laboratory component introduces basic skills of viewing, handling, isolating, growing, and identifying microorganisms. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101 and MAT035

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO204
Introduction to Public Health

This course provides an introduction to the public health. Its biomedical basis, including infectious and non-infectious diseases, environmental pollutants, and related factors are discussed. Other topics covered include social, behavioral, and environmental factors that affect public health, Federal, state and international health agencies. Epidemiological principles, surveillance and regulation are addressed with analysis of case studies. Emerging diseases, biotechnology, and new investigative tools are also introduced.

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score, ENL101, and a 4-credit science course with lab component

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
BIO205
General Ecology

The lecture portion of this course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of ecology including the interactions of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Students will be introduced to the techniques of ecological data gathering and analysis. The laboratory exposes students to the field techniques used in investigating different ecological communities, specifically of Cape Cod, and emphasizes team-based research. One Saturday field trip is required for the laboratory component. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours per week)

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a grade of C or higher in BIO151 or ENV118

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO210
Bird Biology

This is an introduction to the biology of birds and their behavior. Special emphasis is given to species of the United States and Massachusetts. A wide range of topics is presented, including field identification by sight and sound; taxonomy; breeding biology; foraging ecology; feather structure; flight; migration and orientation; anatomy and physiology. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours per week).

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in BIO151 or ENV118 or permission of instructor.

Offered: Varies

Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO241
Cell Biology

This course provides an introduction to cell structure, function, and physiology. Topics include the function of cellular organelles, enzymes and their role in metabolism and regulation, synthesis of macromolecules, and gene expression and regulation.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a grade of C or better in CHM151 and BIO151 or BIO251

Offered: Fall

4
BIO242
Molecular Genetics

This course fulfills the requirements of a second year elective for a CCCC degree in Biology. It builds upon the foundational principles of molecular biology and genetics introduced in BIO151 (General Biology I). Topics covered will include cellular replication; chromosomal structure and inheritance; gene expression, regulation and development; and biotechnology. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours).

Prerequisite: BIO151

Offered: Spring

4
BIO251
Human Anatomy & Physiology I

A comprehensive systematic study of the human body emphasizing the structure and function of the systems. Part I topics include: cells and tissues, chemistry review, metabolism, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and reproductive systems and metabolism with correlated laboratory work. (3 class hours/ 2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in CHM109 or (BIO101 or BIO151) or (CHM101 or CHM151)

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO252
Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a comprehensive systematic study of the human body emphasizing the structure and function of several organ systems. Human Anatomy & Physiology II covers the following organ systems: nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, and urinary. Lecture topics are correlated with laboratory work (3 class hours/ 2 laboratory hours).

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in BIO107 or BIO251

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
BIO281
Microbiology

An introduction to microorganisms and their activities, for health-related majors. The topics cover cell structure, classification, metabolism, methods of control, antimicrobial drugs, genetics, microbial and host defenses, immunology and applications, representative infectious diseases, and food and industrial microbiology. Independent study is encouraged. The laboratory component introduces basic procedures of handling, growing, and identifying microorganisms. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours per week)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in (CHM151 or CHM109) and in (BIO151 or BIO251)

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
SCI150
Scientific Writing & Presentation

This course develops technical writing and presentation skills of students pursuing STEM careers. The course components are organized around: collection, evaluation, and organization of information from reliable sources; making critical summaries; writing a scientific/technical report in a recognized format (APA, MLA, IEEE, etc.); making oral and slide presentations with multimedia and poster presentations. Grammar, spelling, proofreading, and effective writing and presentation skills are emphasized.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in ENL101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies an Interdisciplinary Studies General Education Elective.

3
SCI261
Cooperative Work Experience in the Natural Sciences

This course provides students the opportunity to participate in a laboratory or field project in the natural sciences, under the supervision of a mentor. The course provides the student with the opportunity to apply the principles learned in the classroom to a practical real-world project. The project may be performed on campus, or at an off-campus location. The project outline needs to be approved by the department. Time commitment is based on the number of credits, approximately 70 hours per credit.

Prerequisite: Two 4-credit science with labs courses with a grade of C or higher and approval of the department

Offered: Varies

1–4
Business Credits
BUS100
Introduction to Business

Students examine the purpose, role and responsibility of business in American society and gain a broad overview of the functions, institutions, principles and practices of business and other organizations. This course provides a basic foundation for those students who will specialize in business and an opportunity for non-business majors to learn about the business world as a major social institution.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS102
Business Communication

This course is designed to expose the student to a variety of communication modes available to individuals employed in today's business environment. The following major areas are addressed: communication theory, electronic communications in business, oral presentations, ethical practices and written business documents. The importance of accurate communications and the development of language art skills are emphasized. Business communications and formats, including business reports, letters, and memos, are studied.

Prerequisite: GIT102 or 30 wpm and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BUS103
Supervision

This course provides an opportunity to learn effective supervisory practices. Although various concepts and theories are covered to provide a conceptual framework for management and supervision, the emphasis will be on the practical experiences of supervisors.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS107
Human Resource Management

Students learn about the principles and practices of human resource management including staffing, developing, motivating, leading and controlling the human resources of a business, government or non-profit agency.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS112
Organizational Behavior

Students acquire the skills required to successfully evaluate their behavior in organizational settings. Students analyze how each person within an organization effects an organization and how an organization effects each person. Group/team dynamics are explored in order to see their effect on group and individual performance. Issues that impact the success of an organization are studied. Tools appropriate for accomplishing dynamic change, breaking communication barriers, resolving conflicts, improving leadership skills, and inspiring motivation and collaboration are explored.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
BUS120
Business Law I

This course is a comprehensive guide to the basic principles and practices of Business Law including an introduction to law and its application in the business world. The course covers business ethics; the judicial process and court systems; the constitutional grounds for business regulation; torts, personal, real, and intellectual property; contracts, sales, agency, employment law, business organizations including partnerships and corporations; and government regulation of business.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS201
Business Finance

This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of financial management. Includes the study of the procurement and effective use of funds in a business, budget preparation, alternative sources of funds, and control of working capital.

Prerequisite: ACC202 or ACC105

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS214
Management

Provides an introduction to principles and techniques of management as they relate to business, government, and non-profit organizations. Includes the study of the functions of management: coordinating, problem-solving, decision-making, communicating, planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and BUS100

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
BUS261
Business Administration Cooperative Work Experience

Students work in an organizational setting for no less than 150 hours to receive practical training and experience related to the student's academic program. All students enrolled in Business Administration programs are encouraged to take a cooperative work experience. This course is limited to students enrolled in Business Administration programs.

Prerequisite: Approval by the Business internship instructor

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

3
Chemistry Credits
CHM106
Survey of Chemistry

Presents the fundamentals of chemistry that are integral to an understanding of physical and biological processes. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between these processes and contemporary environmental topics. For non-science majors. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM109
Chemistry for the Health Sciences I

An introductory course for students in various health-related programs. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of inorganic chemistry. Some organic chemistry is introduced. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM151
General Chemistry I

This course emphasizes the atomic nature of matter, fundamental laws and theories of mass and energy, the periodic classification of elements, chemical bonding, nomenclature, kinetic molecular theory applied to solids, liquids and gases, solution chemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Laboratory studies reinforce the principles and concepts studied in lecture and will initiate the student to sound methods of scientific investigation. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT040 or MAT045 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores. Co-requisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM152
General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHM151. Considers the study of chemical families, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, solubility products, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Laboratory studies reinforce the principles and concepts studied in lecture and include the qualitative analysis of metals. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHM101 or CHM151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM251
Organic Chemistry I

This course covers organic nomenclature, bonding, structure, reaction theory, aliphatic hydrocarbons, functional groups, stereochemistry, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and reaction mechanisms. The laboratory emphasizes basic laboratory techniques for separation, purification and synthesis. (3 class hours/4 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CHM102 or CHM152

Offered: Fall

5
CHM252
Organic Chemistry II

Continues CHM251 Organic Chemistry I. It includes nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, name reactions, synthesis, organic qualitative analysis, carbanions, oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, spectroscopy and biochemical processes. In the laboratory, organic qualitative analysis, sysnthesis, and spectroscopy of organic compounds are taught. (3 class hours/4 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHM201 or CHM252

Offered: Spring

5
Communication Credits
COM100
Voice and Diction

This course provides the student with basic vocal skills. Particular attention is paid to incorporating techniques to open the voice, breathing, tone production, articulation, and diction. This course is designed for the students working to improve their oral skills with an interest toward performance and/or oration.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM103
Human Communication

This course fosters and improves competence in intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication situations. Students demonstrate skills necessary to communicate effectively through exercises and presentations that reflect practical, real-world situations. The purpose of the course is to improve the student's skill in communication by providing relevant knowledge and opportunity to apply that knowledge.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or ESL102 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM105
Survey of Mass Communication

This course explores the history, social impact, forms, and techniques of such media as newspapers, film, books, radio, television, and other expressions of mass culture. The aims of the course are to enable the student to better understand the new media-oriented environment in which we find ourselves and to explore various options available as a consumer of public information.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM113
Radio Broadcasting

This course is designed to instruct the student in the operation of a radio station. On-air and off-air broadcasting techniques are discussed. Broadcast management, legal requirements, announcing, and copywriting are considered as they relate to specific assignments and duties at a radio station. Decisions involving programming formats are considered. Students apply knowledge to individual and collective work projects. Students in this course are expected to be proficient in computer file management skills. (60 contact hours per semester)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
COM114
Radio Production

Designed to instruct the student in radio production. Audio production, equipment, engineering, audio editing software, copywriting, broadcast delivery, and production techniques are considered as they relate to specific assignments and duties at a radio station. Students learn digital audio techniques that can be applied to a variety of communications settings such as: podcasting, commercial production, public relations, and audio for the web. Students apply knowledge to individual and collective work projects. Students in this course are expected to be proficient in computer file management skills. (60 contact hours per semester)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
COM131
Introduction to Video Production

Students learn video production through lectures and hands-on projects. Specific skills covered include concept development, storyboarding, proper video camera operation, framing, and camera angles. While learning about the equipment and techniques used in video production and post production, students write and produce two projects that are edited on a non-linear system and screened in class for review. Students in this course are expected to be proficient in computer file management skills.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM201
Interpersonal Communication

This course is designed to improve human relationships through an understanding of the principles of effective interpersonal communication. Students participate actively in listening, perceiving, interpreting words and meanings, conflict resolution, assertiveness, nonverbal awareness, developing trusting relationships, and considering the role of the self-concept.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM203
Public Speaking

A study of elements of public communication through various one-to-many speaking situations. Emphases includes communication theory, speaker-audience relationships, speaker resources, speech construction and delivery.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101 or ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM204
Persuasive Communication

A study of the process of persuasion, focusing on the formation of beliefs, attitudes and values, fundamentals of attitude change, audience analysis, the persuasive message, effects of channel and setting, and source credibility. Opportunities are offered for classroom application of the principles and theory discussed.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101 or ENL108

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM205
Oral Interpretation/Readers Theater

A performance course involving the analysis and aesthetic appreciation of literature (lyric, narrative, and drama) through the medium of oral interpretation. This course incorporates techniques for control of self (body and voice), control of the literary object, control of the audience, and critique of solo and group performances. Rehearsals outside of class time may be required; please see instructor.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101 or THR103

Offered: Varies

3
COM206
Communication in Current Settings

This course addresses special topics of interest for students interested in the communication discipline. Course topics vary from semester to semester. Students are exposed to a diverse range of subject matter to provide familiarity with advanced theories and approaches in communication studies.

Prerequisite: COM103

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
COM207
Argumentation and Debate

This class provides an overview of the study of argumentation. Students learn argumentation theories and approaches while gaining skills in critical thinking and public speaking. By the end of the semester, students understand how to research and build an argument; how to anticipate, construct, and refute arguments; and how to evaluate the political, moral, and cultural contexts of argumentation.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101 or ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
COM208
Broadcast Writing and Presentation

This course is designed to give students a full understanding of how to write for broadcast media, and the skills needed to read copy on the air. Topics covered include news writing, sports writing, commercial writing, public service announcements, editorial writing, as well as questions of news standards, practices, and ethics. Students master writing on deadline, fact checking, and delivering copy in written and verbal form.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Varies

3
COM209
Event Planning

Students analyze ways in which organizations communicate their image and message through events and promotions. Students learn organizational communication theory as it relates to events planning and gain practice in planning, critiquing and analyzing events.

Prerequisite: COM103 or COM201 or COM202

Offered: varies.

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
COM213
Advanced Debate

This class is a continuation of COM207 Argumentation and Debate. It provides in-depth training in intercollegiate competitive debating. Students advance their skills in debate topic analysis and preparation and further strengthen their ability to build clear, organized, and coherent arguments. Students enrolling in this class are required to represent the debate club in various media contexts and/or public debates, as well as intercollegiate debate tournaments.

Prerequisite: COM207

Offered: Varies

3
COM231
Advanced Radio Production

Buidling upon the skill based in COM113, students learn advanced radio production skills. Advanced production techniques are discussed and applied to on-air and remote broadcasts. Students learn production software and automation broadcast software in regards to music/commercial programming and voice tracking.

Prerequisite: COM113

Offered: Spring

3
COM262
Mass Communication Cooperative Work Experience

This course is designed to expand student knowledge through actual work involvement within an area of mass communication. Working with a mentor and collaborating with an employer, the student develops a list of learning objectives that become an integral part of the experience.

Prerequisite: COM105, 6 other hours from mass communication suggested sequence list, and permission of co-op coordinator

Note: May be repeated once; 6 credits maximum.

1–3
Computer Science Credits
CSC105
Computer Programming I: Python

In this introduction to the field of computer science, students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in Python. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, string processing, and basic searching and sorting algorithms are covered. Python provides an introduction to programming for students in any academic discipline.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
CSC110
Computer Programming I: Java

In this introduction to the field of computer science, students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in Java. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, string processing, and arrays are covered. Java provides an introduction to programming for students in any academic discipline.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
CSC120
Computer Programming I: C++

Students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in C++. Programming style, expression, and documentation are emphasized. Object-oriented programming methodology, graphical user interfaces, debugging techniques, pointers, simple recursion, and string processing are covered.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and working knowledge of any programming language

Offered: Fall

4
CSC125
Procedural Programming

Students design programs in C using a procedural design paradigm that examines issues associated with low-level programming such as explicit memory management, efficiency, pointers, the compilation process, and debugging. C programs are run in a Unix/Linux environment.

Prerequisite: Any college-level programming course

Offered: Fall

4
CSC130
Computer Programming II: Java

Students use projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test large computer programs in Java, with emphasis on programming style, expression, and documentation. Object-oriented programming methodology, abstract data types, data structures, internal searching and sorting methods, exceptions, generics, multithreading, and simple recursion are covered. Students analyze the efficiency and compare times of recursive and non-recursive sorts and searches, as well as searches of graphs using stacks and queues.

Prerequisite: CSC110 or CSC120 or CSC105

Offered: Fall, Spring

4
CSC210
System Software & Assembly Language Programming

Students analyze the design and implementation of the components of software used to run a computer including assemblers, compilers, linkers, loaders, operating systems, debuggers, and macroprocessors. The general concepts of system software are related to the specific implementation of Intel assembly language (MASM) and Java on a Windows system. Students use hands-on projects and teamwork to design, implement, and test programs in Intel assembly language and to use assembly language procedures in a Java program. (This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement.)

Prerequisite: CSC130

Offered: Varies

4
CSC230
Data Structures

Students use data structures and recursion in Java to solve complex problems. Abstract Data Types (ADTs) including lists, stacks, queues, tables, sets, maps, heaps, and trees are examined and implemented. Students analyze the theoretical and actual running times of the alternate ADT implementations as well as internal/external searching and sorting algorithms, graph algorithms, and hashing.

Prerequisite: CSC130

Offered: Fall

4
CSC240
Introduction to Computer Systems

Students investigate how computer systems execute programs, store information, and communicate in order to become more effective programmers in terms of performance, portability, and robustness. Topics covered include: machine-level code and its generation by optimizing compilers, performance evaluation and optimization, computer arithmetic, memory organization and management, networking technology and protocols, and supporting concurrent computation. 4 class hours.

Prerequisites: CSC130

Offered: Varies

4
CSC250
Computer Organizational & Architecture

Students acquire an understanding and appreciation of a computer system’s functional components, their characteristics, performance, and interactions. Students evaluate computer architecture to develop programs that can achieve high performance through a programmer’s awareness of parallelism and latency. In selecting a system to use, students analyze the tradeoff among various components, such as CPU clock speed, cycles per instruction, memory size, and average memory access time. Topics include digital logic, assembly language machine organization, and hardware-level C and assembly language programming.

Prerequisite: CSC130

Offered: Varies

4
Construction Technology Credits
CON100
Quantitative Skills for Construction

This course will apply fundamental mathematical skills and critical thinking to solve basic construction problems. A review of numbers, fractions, ratios, angles and triangles, weights, measures and conversions, and formulas for calculating area and volume will be included. Problem solving will use cases that introduce concepts of the estimating process for selected parts of a construction project including lumber pricing, footings, foundations, girders, sill plates, bridging, floor joists, flooring, wall framing, and roofing.

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

2
CON101
Introduction to Construction Documents

This course introduces fundamentals of reading and interpreting construction documents including plan views, elevations, sections, details, schedules and notes. The symbols and language of construction are studied through the review and study of glossaries, legends and specifications. Application of the arithmetic of construction documents is included.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
CON105
Methods & Materials of Construction

Students learn about basic construction materials including properties and limitations, fabrication processes, and their effect on the fabrication of buildings. Field procedures are used to study qualitative and quantitative technological characteristics along with the proper use, selection, specifications, strength and limitations, fire resistance, and code conformity of materials. Students develop a working knowledge of zoning, site plans, FEMA flood zones, insurance and contract documents.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
CON110
Construction Technology

Students learn the process of constructing a residence or commercial building from ground to finish. Proper business, tax, and technical paper work are covered. This course and CON120 may be helpful in obtaining information and skills necessary to pass the Massachusetts Construction Supervisors Exam.

Prerequisite: None

3
CON115
Construction Estimating

Students explore various systems and methods for estimating construction costs of residential and commercial buildings, including elements of cost associated with construction technology and project management. The scope includes sub-systems, earthwork foundations, timber, steel, and masonry structure. The course emphasizes relationships in quantities of specific materials with the department variable of associated labor.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
CON121
MA State Building Code – Residential

Students develop a working knowledge of the Massachusetts State Building Code for residential properties and learn the process of constructing a residential building from ground to finish with an emphasis on building code requirements. This course is helpful in obtaining information and skills necessary to pass the Massachusetts Restricted – One and Two Family Dwelling Construction Supervisors Exam.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
CON122
MA State Building Code – Unrestricted

Students develop an in-depth working knowledge of the Massachusetts State Building Code for commercial properties and learn to interpret and apply the code requirements. This course is designed for the general building contractor, for persons engaged in the design and construction of buildings, and for code enforcement officials and firefighters. This course is helpful in obtaining information and skills necessary to pass the Massachusetts Unrestricted Construction Supervisors Exam.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
CON130
Computer Aided Drafting I

This course is a first course in computer aided drafting including an introduction to AutoCAD, drawing, editing drawings, applications, using advanced functions, producing hard copy and customizing AutoCAD. The emphasis of this course is in developing drafting techniques using the computer as the drafting tool. Specific topics include system set up, 2-D drawing, editing drawings, multi-view, drawing, orthographic views, dimensioning, sectional views, and graphic patterns.

Prerequisite: None

3
CON135
Computer Aided Drafting II

This course is a second course in computer aided drafting. A brief review of CON130 will be followed by the following topic development: threads and fasteners, auxiliary views, revolutions, shop processes, working drawings, isometric and three dimensional drawings, rendering, and expanding AutoCAD applications.

Prerequisite: CON130

3
CON200
Architectural Drafting I

This course focuses on architectural drafting techniques utilizing AutoCAD drafting software as the drafting tool. Students review and expand their knowledge of AutoCAD drawing commands and techniques while learning basic through advanced drafting concepts. The production of a basic set of architectural drawings is completed throughout the semester.

Prerequisite: CON130

Offered: Varies

3
CON201
Architectural Drafting II

This advanced course provides students with practical experience in preparing working drawings for building construction. The class utilizes concepts developed in CON130 and CON200 utilizing AutoCAD drafting and documentation software. A complete set of residential working drawings are prepared over the course of the semester. A comprehensive exploration of the architectural process is communicated and advanced drafting and AutoCAD skills are applied.

Prerequisite: CON200

Offered: Varies

3
Criminal Justice Credits
CRJ100
Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is a study of the nature and history of criminal justice. Students are provided an overview of the three entities of criminal justice system: law enforcement, corrections, and the judicial system. Students examine and evaluate how each entity works separately as well as with each other. Measuring crime and analyzing the ethics of crime control allow students to determine the effectiveness of laws and policies in contemporary society.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
CRJ103
Criminal Law

This course is a study of the nature and extent of substantive law and the rules of criminal procedure, the historical and philosophical foundations of criminal law, highlighting the major concepts of crimes and penalties, and the overall legal system. It will include an emphasis on contemporary state and federal laws and the Constitution of the United States.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
CRJ105
Criminology, Theory and Practice

This course provides a general overview of the major theories of crime and criminal behavior, as well as the scope and nature of the criminal justice system and the problem of crime.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
CRJ116
Introduction To Corrections

This course is a general overview of corrections in the United States today, concentrating on the history, organization and administration of corrections, as well as sentencing, corrections law, career issues, tactical operations and the future of corrections.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
CRJ117
Correctional Law

This course is a survey of correctional law with emphasis on Federal and Massachusetts cases and regulation that govern the detention of prisoners, sentenced and un-sentenced. Emphasis will be placed on the balance between inmate's and detainee's rights versus the safety and security of the public. The relationship among local rules, Massachusetts Code of Regulation and Federal Regulations governing correctional facilities will be discussed.

Prerequisites: CRJ116

Offered: Spring

3
CRJ125
Contemporary Policing

This course is a general overview of policing in the United States today, concentrating in history, organization - public and private - as well as personal issues, police operations, and critical and emerging issues.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
CRJ130
Criminal Evidence

This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts of criminal evidence as applied in the criminal justice environment. It includes a description of the trial process and types of evidence. The course presents principles relating to the United States Constitution and those principles relating to the law enforcement professional as a witness.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Summer

3
CRJ135
Terrorism

This course acquaints students with the concept of terrorism at both the international and domestic level, examining the history of terrorism, terrorism today, and terrorism in the future.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score or permission of instructor

Offered: Spring, Summer

3
CRJ206
Principles of Investigation I

This course examines the organization and functions of investigative agencies, preparation and presentation of accurate written and verbal reports, courtroom presentation of evidence, and elements of legal proof.

Prerequisite: All Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Fall

3
CRJ207
Principles of Investigation II

This course is a continuation of CRJ206. It introduces the students to the collection, presentation, and analysis of physical evidence, and investigation of specific offenses.

Prerequisite: CRJ206 and all Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Spring

3
CRJ210
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice

This course examines ethical principles as they apply to the many practical problems which confront criminal justice professionals in the performance of their duties and responsibilities. Wherever possible, concrete case studies will be used to illustrate ethical reasoning.

Prerequisite: All Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Fall

 

3
CRJ220
Crisis Intervention for Criminal Justice Professionals

This course explores the relationship of criminal justice professionals and crisis intervention. Special emphasis will be placed upon the development and utilization of helping skills in dealing with crisis situations.

Prerequisite: CRJ116 and PSY101

Offered: Fall

3
CRJ221
Juvenile Justice

This course is designed to introduce students to the Juvenile Justice system, the processes and the law pertaining to the system by presenting a thorough examination of the social, historical, and legal context within which delinquency and Juvenile Justice practice occurs.

Prerequisite: All Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Spring

3
CRJ240
Selected Issues in Criminal Justice

The course seeks to explore issues that are currently facing the criminal justice system. The current topic is Exploring Differences, Multiculturalism and Beyond.

Prerequisite: All Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Spring

3
CRJ261
Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience

A supervised work/learning experience in a local criminal justice agency combined with a seminar component for student feedback and evaluation. The student must complete 150 hours of supervised work. Required for A.S. in Criminal Justice.

Prerequisite: All Level I Criminal Justice courses

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
CRJ262
Corrections Cooperative Work Experience

A supervised work/learning experience specifically in the field of corrections combined with a seminar component for student feedback and evaluation. The student must complete 150 hours of supervised work. All students must be able to pass successful CORI/SORI background checks and meet technical standards.

Prerequisites: Completion of all certificate course requirements

Offered: Varies

3
Dental Hygiene Credits
DEN101
Oral Tissues I

In this course designed for first semester dental hygiene students, the student learns the basic anatomy of the teeth and dental nomenclature. This study is further developed by concentrating on functions and forms of teeth with emphasis on eruption dates of both primary and permanent dentitions and root morphology of permanent teeth. An introduction to general histology and embryology of the face and oral cavity completes the course.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores and CHM109

Offered: Fall

2
DEN102
Oral Tissues II

In this course designed for second semester dental hygiene students, the student learns the basic histology of the teeth and supporting structures of the oral cavity. The second part of the course covers anatomy of the head and neck with emphasis on bones of the skull, muscles, nerves, and blood supply to the oral structures.

Prerequisite: DEN101

Offered: Spring

2
DEN103
Principles of Oral Radiology

This course provides the student with information concerning: principles of x-radiation; components of the x-ray tube; equipment usage, safety, and maintenance; parallel/bisecting-angle, special patient techniques; digital radiography; radiographic interpretation; manual/automatic processing; and infection control information. Lab experience includes: parallel and snap-a-ray technique; digital radiography, panelipse, special patient techniques with automatic processing equipment.

Prerequisite: CHM109

Offered: Fall

3
DEN105
Community Dental Health

Community Dental Health is the science and art of promoting oral health and preventing oral disease in a community setting. Through this course, the student will acquire the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviors necessary to promote dental health and prevent dental disease through organized community-based programs. Students will be introduced to basic principles of research methodology and biostatistics, epidemiological indices, population needs, and community health planning methods for dental education of the public.

Prerequisite: DEN123 and DEN128

Offered: Spring

2
DEN121
Dental Hygiene I

This first course introduces the student to the profession of dental hygiene, the dental hygiene code of ethics, principles of infection and exposure control, and the CDC Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. The dental hygiene process of care with an emphasis on the assessment phase is presented. Oral hard and soft deposits are discussed along with an introduction to safety and emergency procedures. Additionally, oral health education and oral physiotherapy techniques are introduced.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and CHM109

Offered: Fall

2
DEN123
Dental Hygiene II

This course continues the study of the dental hygiene process of care begun in DEN121. The dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment care plan are introduced as well as specific treatment modalities. Emphasis is placed on the dental hygiene care and management of patients at each life stage and the management of the medically compromised patient. Additionally, individuals with physical, sensory and mental disabilities are studied.

Prerequisite: DEN121

Offered: Spring

2
DEN126
Clinical Dental Hygiene I

The principles, protocols and components of the dental hygiene process of care described in DEN121 are applied in a pre-clinical setting. Additionally, ergonomics, patient/operator positioning, selective polishing and instrumentation skills with assessment and debridement instruments are introduced and practiced on both typodonts and student partners. Instrument sharpening skills are developed.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall

3
DEN128
Clinical Dental Hygiene II

Previously acquired knowledge, skills and values applicable to comprehensive dental hygiene care are reviewed. Components of the dental hygiene process of care presented in Dental Hygiene II are applied in a clinical setting. The primary focus of this course is for students to increase and refine their skills in the areas of assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, care planning, implementation and evaluation while providing comprehensive care to patients of various population groups in a safe and ethical manner.

Prerequisite: DEN121 and DEN126

Offered: Spring

4
DEN200
Pharmacology for Dental Hygiene

This course addresses the basic principles of pharmacology and anesthesiology and applies this knowledge to the treatment of dental hygiene patients. The student applies the knowledge of drugs, their actions, and the use of the drugs used in dentistry and their impact on patients. The course content includes the physical and chemical properties, preparations, mode of administration, and effect on body systems, as well as reference to medical emergencies associated with dental treatment.

Prerequisite: DEN121 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Spring

3
DEN205
Oral Pathology

This course incorporates important aspects of general pathology and their relationship to the oral cavity. The course stresses comprehensive oral examination procedures, recognition of deviations from the normal, and clinical aspects of pathological processes affecting the patient as a whole and the oral cavity.

Prerequisite: DEN121 and DEN126

Offered: Spring

3
DEN209
Dental Materials

A study of the science of dental materials including the physical, chemical, and biological properties, manipulation and care of materials used in the prevention and treatment of oral disease. The scientific and clinical properties of gypsum materials, impression materials, waxes, porcelain, dental abrasives, cements, resins, and metals used in dentistry are discussed in lecture and manipulated in laboratory sessions with special emphasis on the materials within the scope of the practice of Dental Hygiene.( 2 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: CHM109 and DEN101

Offered: Fall

3
DEN211
Periodontics

This course is an advanced study of the periodontium and its relationship to clinical practice. Incorporating current research, emphasis will be placed on the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, the relationship between periodontal health and systemic health, risk factors, methods of assessment, and current therapies for treatment and maintenance of the periodontal patient.

Prerequisite: DEN123 and DEN128

Offered: Fall

2
DEN230
Dental Hygiene III

Advanced procedures and related specialties are discussed and integrated into the clinical experience. Some of the topics which will be discussed include implants, dental specialties, health promotion, risk assessment, and the use of advanced technologies in dental hygiene practice.

Prerequisite: DEN123 and DEN128

Offered: Fall

2
DEN232
Dental Hygiene IV

In lecture, students will be introduced to areas of private practice: ethics, practice acts, national and regional licensure, professional organizations, practice managment, recare management, and computer use. Discussions include resume writing, the job interview and the future of dental hygiene.

Prerequisite: DEN230

Offered: Spring

2
DEN236
Clinical Dental Hygiene III

This course, designed for third semester dental hygiene students, consists of clinical sessions in which advanced clinical procedures and advanced radiographic procedures are integrated into the clinical experience. (196 clinic hours)

Prerequisite: DEN123 and DEN128

Offered: Fall

4
DEN237
Pain Management in Dental Hygiene Practice

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive study of local dental anesthetics utilized in the dental hygiene profession. Utilizing lecture and lab components, the student will learn to safely administer topical and local dental anesthetics. This course covers Massachusetts Rules and Regulations 234CMR3.09-3.14, and the requirements in the administration of local dental anesthetics.

Prerequisite: DEN123 and DEN128

Offered: Fall

2
DEN238
Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

This course, designed for fourth semester dental hygiene students, consists of clinical sessions which provide further refinement of clinical skills emphasizing the role of expanded duties in therapy, prevention, and control of periodontal disease. (196 clinic hours)

Prerequisite: DEN230 and DEN236

Offered: Spring

4
Developmental Education (Non-degree credits) Credits
ENL025
Reading & Writing Essentials

This course provides students with foundation reading and writing skills in preparation for college-level coursework. Students learn strategies for reading non-fiction material, write basic academic essays, and begin the process of documenting sources.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ENL045
Sentence Strategies

This course is an intensive developmental writing course focusing on eliminating certain repeated errors appearing in adult Standard American English (SAE) writing, particularly in the following areas: sentence types and expanded combinations including relevant punctuation, subject-predicate and pronoun agreements, word order. Students engage in intensive practice using sentences as independent structures and within paragraphs and short essays.

Prerequisite: Appropriate CPT score (RC 68+, SS 68-87), instructor's screening

Offered: Varies

2
ENL080
Developing Vocabulary

This mini-course is designed to expand the students' general vocabulary and provide intensive practice in major skills of word attack through structural analysis and contextual clues.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

Note: Pass-Fail

1
ENL082
Study Skills

This mini-course is designed to help students understand more about their learning styles, improve their study skills and develop the self discipline they need to be successful college students. This concise, practical course focuses on the key skills essential to college success: listening, note taking, reading, writing and taking exams.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

Note: Pass-Fail

1
ENL083
Basic Grammar Review

This course helps students understand the basic structure of English grammar and punctuation. This course focuses on the key elements of grammar and punctuation.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

Note: Pass-Fail

1
MAT010
Fundamental Arithmetic

A mastery-based course in basic arithmetic operations and techniques designed to provide a thorough coverage of whole number arithmetic, fractions, and decimals. Applications are used extensively to develop problem-solving techniques. The course focuses on basic computational skills, study skills, and background needed to succeed in subsequent courses. Students use the language of arithmetic to understand basic arithmetic vocabulary and to read/write simple quantitative statements. (This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement.)

Prerequisite: None. Recommendation by basic skills assessment score.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Letter grade or Pass-Fail.

3
MAT025
Pre-Algebra

A fundamental course in prerequisite algebraic topics designed to help prepare students for the study of introductory algebra and its applications. Topics include: introduction to, operation with, and application of whole numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals; exponentiation, rooting, order of operations, ratios, rates, proportions, unit conversions, percents and their applications; an introduction to algebraic expressions and equations, applications of algebraic expressions and equations, geometry, and measurement. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT010 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semesters offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
MAT035
Algebra for Non-STEM

An algebra course designed to prepare students for college-level non-STEM math courses, address the quantitative needs of other disciplines, and develop quantitative reasoning skills for citizenship and workplace. Concepts are introduced through meaningful applications and in-class activities. Topics include proportional reasoning, scientific notation, creating and interpreting tables and graphs, solving linear and quadratic equations algebraically, solving systems of linear equations, linear and non-linear functions, and creating mathematical models of real-world problems using technology. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semesters offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
MAT041
Elementary Algebra for STEM

This course introduces the basic concepts in algebra necessary for students who plan to take intermediate algebra for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). Topics include: properties and operations on real numbers, linear equations, interval notations, inequalities, absolute value, graphing, function notations, linear systems, exponents, polynomials, factoring and word problem analysis. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
MAT045
Intermediate Algebra for STEM

This developmental course prepares students for College Algebra, which is essential to the Natural Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics curriculum. Topics include: graphing, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, rational exponents, quadratic equations, variation, conic sections, functions, and logarithms. Development of problem solving skills is emphasized throughout the course. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT041) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semesters offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
Early Childhood Education Credits
ECE100
Introduction to Early Childhood Education

This course will explore the role of the early childhood teacher and his/her responsibilities: forming a professional attitude, relating effectively with others, and managing successfully within the pre-school environment in daily learning and social situations. It will include observations of children in a child care setting. (12 hours observation/field work per semester)

Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE105
Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs (Birth–8 years)

This course will focus on children with special needs in early childhood settings. Based on a developmental perspective, course content includes the various areas of exceptionality in terms of causes, characteristics and general intervention, strategies for adapting the learning environment, modifying instruction and making curriculum accessible to all children through inclusion of those with special needs. Attention will be given to State and Federal Legislation, the referral process, community resources, and effective ways to work with families. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: ECE100 or PSY201

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE110
Child Growth and Development

This course examines child development from conception to age nine by considering the complex interaction between hereditary and environmental factors. Children's physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development are discussed, as well as the implications for developmentally appropriate practice. It includes the theories of Erikson, Piaget, and Vygotsky. Students are required to observe children in a child care setting. This course is restricted to applicants for State teacher certification of infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ECE115
Literacy and the Young Child

This course describes how children acquire language and literacy, and how teachers can design classrooms and experiences to promote oral and written language development. The course stresses planning for individual children, including children with special needs and English language learners, as well as understanding the importance of the child's family in language and literacy development. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE200
Teaching Infants and Toddlers

This course emphasizes the development needs of infants and toddlers. Special focus includes planning curriculum for the very young, working with parents, special development needs of infants and toddlers, and planning their environment. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: PSY201 or ECE100

Offered: Spring

3
ECE201
Preschool Curriculum Planning

This course explores the curriculum planning for inclusive preschool settings, children ages 2.9–5 years. Participants develop a framework for planning, implementation, organization, and evaluation of activities in content areas such as art, math, science, music, language arts, and free play. The course emphasizes high-quality, developmentally appropriate practice, aligned with state and national standards and guidelines. (10 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: ECE100 or PSY201

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE202
Advanced Curriculum Development: Creative Experiences for Early Childhood Education

Experiences at both the adult and child level designed to help students understand the creative process and appropriate ways of encouraging creativity in young children ages 2–7 in inclusive settings. Students are required to try out their ideas with children. Emphasis is on art, as well as science, math, language arts, music, movement, and dramatic play. The course also explores the influence of international models, such as Reggio Emilia. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite:ECE201

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE206
Field Experience in Early Childhood Education

This course gives students the opportunity to complete supervised field hours in a licensed and approved early childhood education setting. The course emphasizes high-quality developmentally appropriate practice, aligned with state and national standards and guidelines, including the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Professional Development Standards. Students must submit a CORI application prior to beginning the lab hours. (20 hours observation/field work, 5 class hours)

Prerequisite: ECE100 and ECE200 or ECE201

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

1
ECE211
Curriculum Strategies for Teaching Math & Science to Young Children

Explore strategies, activities, and materials for teaching math and science to children in inclusive preschool and kindergarten settings. The course focuses on state and national standards and guidelines, as well as the constructivist project approach to teaching science and math. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: PSY201

Offered: Varies

3
ECE221
Classroom Management: Skills and Strategies for Early Childhood Teachers

This course explores classroom management strategies for inclusive toddler, preschool, and after-school settings; including creating a pro-social environment, resilience and risk factors, and using a positive, respectful approach to guiding children based on knowledge of child development. (6 hours observation/field work)

Prerequisite: PSY201 or ECE110

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ECE230
Practicum in Early Childhood Education Preschool

This course provides the student with the opportunity to work directly with infants, toddlers, or preschool children in an inclusive early childhood education program. Coursework includes 150 hours (12 hours/week minimum) working in a Massachusetts licensed or NAEYC accredited child care facility, as well as a weekly seminar class. The practicum meets state requirements for 9 months child care experience. (150 field work hours; 14 class hours)

Prerequisite: ECE105, ECE201, PSY201 and (ECE200 or ECE202) and a minimum 2.0 GPA in ECE courses

Offered: Fall, Spring

6
ECE242
Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education

This course serves as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in Early Childhood Education introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory-level social and/or behavioral science course

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: 1, 2, or 3 credits; may be repeated for credit; 3 credits maximum.

1–3
ECE290
Administration of Early Childhood Programs

This course is designed to guide Early Childhood professionals in establishing or reinforcing existing programs for young children, to give a working knowledge of the concepts, ideas and methods necessary to administer these programs, including Mass. Dept. of Early Education and Care regulations, budgets, and other financial issues, legal issues, family communication, and staff issues (hiring, firing, supervision, turnover, training). Meets EEC requirements for Director I.

Prerequisite: ECE201 or ECE202 or ECE221 or ECE230 or ECE291

Offered: Fall

Note: Students should contact the Early Childhood Education Coordinator prior to registering for this course.

3
ECE291
Leadership and Management in Early Childhood Education

This course explores administrative issues relating to leadership in Early Childhood Education: management styles, staff development and supervision including teacher training, staff collegiality, retention and evaluation, as well as collaboration with parents and community. This course meets Director II specifications EEC certification.

Prerequisite: ECE110 or PSY201

Offered: Spring

2
Earth Science Credits
ESC101
Introduction to Earth Science

This is a one-semester, liberal arts and sciences course with a laboratory, designed to introduce the concept that planet Earth represents a dynamic, integrated system. The nature and characteristics of the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere are considered. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
ESC105
Fundamentals Of Oceanography

A general introduction to the scientific study of the ocean environment including the physical, chemical, geological and biological properties of the sea. Some field trips may be required. This course is intended for non-science majors. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
Economics Credits
ECO117
Principles of Macroeconomics

This course is an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics including current economic problems, national income, employment, prices, monetary and fiscal policy to stabilize the economy. Emphasis is given to economic growth and the international economy.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO118
Principles 0f Microeconomics

This course covers principles of microeconomics including functioning of competitive and non-competitive markets, price and wage theory, labor and agricultural economics, income distribution, and comparative economic systems.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO119
Investments

The course is intended to provide the student with an introductory fundamental understanding of the theoretical and practical concepts of investments. Areas that are covered are:valuations of securities and debt instruments, risk/reward in decision making, construction of portfolios, and practical applications in investment strategies. The course will enable the student to prepare for a career in finance, as well as to learn how to make rational decisions for personal investing.

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035

3
ECO155
Emerging Market Economies

This interdisciplinary, hands-on course is designed to provide students with the understanding of the workings of the economy and the financial markets. It acquaints students with the tools and concepts of finance and macroeconomics and the ability to apply them to study the stock markets in an emerging economy.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO157
Global Economics

This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary global economic issues, as well as economic tools necessary to analyze them. Primary focus of the course addresses international trade while emphasizing the importance and practical applicability of related issues in international finance and international relations in day-to-day life.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO160
Environmental and Natural Resources Economics

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics uses the basic tools of economic analysis to focus on issues pertaining to the natural environment and its resources. The topics covered include economic externalities, public goods, property rights, market failure, air and water pollution, solid waste management, sustainability concepts, the role of government, and benefit-cost analysis in social planning.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
Education Credits
EDU101
Foundation of Education

This course examines the philosophical, sociocultural, historical, political, and developmental foundations of elementary education in the United States, as well as current issues and future trends. A 40-hour field-based experience in an elementary classroom (grade1-6) is required. This course meets state Elementary Education Transfer Compact requirements. Students enrolling in this course must undergo a CORI (Criminal Offender Record Information) check. (2 class hours/40 field hours)

Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

1
Engineering Credits
ENR101
Intro to Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing

Students are introduced to the world of engineering and manufacturing through activities that showcase how products are designed and built. Teams design, build, and test a weight-bearing structure, as-well-as reverse engineer a product to improve its design. Classroom and laboratory exercises are designed to expose the student to the different engineering and advanced manufacturing disciplines. Lab sessions provide hands-on exposure to the concepts discussed in the lecture sessions. This course does not require any prior engineering background. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies an Interdisciplinary Studies general education requirement.

4
ENR102
3D Mechanical Design I

This is an introductory course for students interested in exploring careers as engineers, architects, and designers. Principles associated with 3D design, visualization, documentation, and product simulation are taught through hands-on use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling software. In addition, student designed parts are fabricated in a 3D printer to enhance the understanding of the design to manufacturing process. (3 class hours/2 lab hours)

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

4
ENR103
Introduction to Robotics

Students work in teams to design, build, program, and test increasingly complex electro-mechanical robots. The course teaches how robots move (locomotion and kinematics), how they sense (perception), and how they reason about their environment (planning). Lecture information is tied to lab experiments and sessions. Students are exposed to robotics related career options in the manufacturing, service, and medical industries. This course does not require any prior engineering background. (3 class hours/2 lab hours)

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

4
ENR104
3D Mechanical Design II

This is the second of a two course design series for students interested in exploring careers as product engineers, architects, and designers. This course will prepare the student for the Certified SolidWorks Associate Exam (CSWA). The CSWA certification indicates a foundation in and apprentice knowledge of 3D CAD and engineering practices and principles.

Prerequisite: ENR102

Offered: Spring

4
ENR105
Circuit Theory and Analysis

This course begins a student’s preparation for a career in electronic, renewable energy, and related fields; it is also well structured for those interested in just expanding their background into the world of electronics. The course focus is on electrical circuit theory as well as analog and digital signal processing. Laboratory experiments are used to reinforce basic concepts and develop laboratory skills, as well as to provide system-level understanding. This course does not require any prior engineering background.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Varies

4
ENR110
Engineering and Scientific Computing

This course introduces students to the elements and practices of computer programming through the MATLAB computation and visualization environment. Assuming no prior background in computer programming, this course will enable one to write programs that solve problems involving the manipulation of numbers. Procedural and object-oriented programming techniques will be taught. Students will be required to complete numerous in-class examples and homework assignments. During the semester, other technical high-level programming languages (e.g., Python) will be introduced through lecture discussion.

Prerequisite: MAT035 or MAT041 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score. Students need to have a basic knowledge of the Windows operating system and file management.

Offered: Varies

3
ENR201
Statics

Learn how to analyze the structural integrity of mechanical devices such as frames, trusses, beams and cable. Using vector algebra and calculus develop an understanding of how Newton's Laws can address engineering static equilibrium problems and develop a mastery of free body diagram construction. Topics include statics of particles, victors and couples, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, forces in beams and cables, friction, distributed forces: moments of inertia.

Prerequisite: ENR101 and MAT240, co-requisite: MAT250

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENR206
Quality Manufacturing

Quality manufacturing is about a philosophy and set of strategies for reducing waste as well as the time required to go from customer order to delivery of a product, with higher quality, less cost, space, and inventory. Learn the techniques for identifying and removing waste within the engineering and manufacturing process as well as methods for improving the "flow" or smoothness of work through a manufacturing environment. As waste is eliminated, quality improves while production time and cost are reduced.

Prerequisite: ENR101

Offered: Varies

3
English Credits
ENL100
Reading and Reflection

In this course students read, discuss, interpret, and write reflectively about a novel or non-fiction book.

Prerequisite: ENL010 or Reading Comprehension Score of 50 or higher

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated for up to 3 credits.

1
ENL101
English Composition I

ENL101 is an introductory college composition course required of all AA and AS-degree students and prerequisite to all other college-level English courses. It is designed to help students develop and express ideas clearly and effectively using standard American English through frequent writing and the study of rhetorical patterns of development. Students learn to write essays using a recognized scholarly documentation style.

Prerequisite: Appropriate scores in Reading Comprehension and in Sentence Skills on Computerized Placement Test or grade of C or better in ENL020 and ENL050 or ESL201. Co-requisite: ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies English Composition/Writing general education requirement.

3
ENL102
English Composition II

A continuation of ENL101, this course is required of all Associate in Arts students and a prerequisite to all upper level English courses. It focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about literature and is designed to help students refine writing skills developed in ENL101.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C-" or higher in ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies either an English Composition/Writing or Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL108
Critical Reading and Thinking

This course guides students enhance their comprehension of written, spoken, and visual information by improving their critical thinking abilities. Through practicing habits of mind to strengthen analytical and reasoning skills, students learn to form well-supported arguments, draw thoughtful conclusions, make responsible decisions, and transfer acquired skills to their academic, professional, and personal life.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL131
Technical Writing

This course introduces students to technical and professional writing within a career setting. Students learn to write reports, instructions, summaries, e-mails, and memos using content and language appropriate to the reader. Students use technology tools to create document layout and design, and to report, interpret and organize statistical information and data.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL161
Journalism I

This course is designed to instruct the student in the collecting, writing, editing and publishing of news and feature articles in periodicals. Although weekly lecture and discussion periods will be mandatory, the emphasis in the course will be on writing news stories outside of regular class time. Each student in the course is expected to be involved in the student newspaper.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL163
Journalism II

This course, a continuation of ENL161, puts the emphasis on an analysis of the elements of journalism and the writing of feature stories, interviews, human interest stories, and various other kinds of reporting. Students in this course learn to proofread, edit, and layout final copy for the MainSheet or other mass media.

Prerequisite: ENL161

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENL170
Producing a Magazine of the Arts

This course is designed to help students sharpen their writing and editing skills as well as learn the nuts and bolts of the publishing process. In this course, students examine existing art publications—and learn about arts publications from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This course allows students to collaborate on a practical, hands-on project resulting in a Student Media Board publication that will be circulated throughout the CCCC community and beyond.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

3
ENL209
Creative Writing

An advanced workshop for students seriously interested in writing for publication. Techniques in short fiction and nonfiction, marketing nonfiction, and the building of a creative imagination are systematically explored.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated once for credit

3
ENL213
Poetry Writing

This poetry writing workshop class provides serious students the opportunity to write poetry of their own and explore poetry through reading others' work. Students will write, read, peer edit/critique, present and listen to poetry.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring

3
ENL216
Advanced Research Report Writing

This course focuses on methods for organizing information, for analytically structuring complex issues, and the logic for making persuasive arguments. Students select topics of interest to them – ranging from studies they have wanted to pursue to projects in their academic specialization. The instructional approach is highly individualized. Seminars center around issues of global significance. The tangible goal is to produce a portfolio piece.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Varies

3
ENL291
Selected Topics in Writing

Selected Topics in Writing provides students the opportunity to explore and practice extensive writing within a writing specialty. Topics may include, among others, writing about photography, writing feature stories, writing commentary and opinion, writing about sports, writing poetry, or writing for children. The course is writing intensive. Specific content will depend on the specialty chosen.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
ETU100
Peer Tutorial Practicum (Language and Literature)

This is a training course for peer tutors. Through readings, journal responses, discussions, and practical experience, the course introduces students to the theories used in writing center work as well as the practical application of those theories. Tutors peer-critique, self-monitor, and tutor. The main objective is for students to become effective peer tutors and better writers.

Prerequisite: Faculty recommendation and a grade of B+ or higher in a composition course

Offered: Varies

1–3
ETU101
Reading Tutorial Practicum

In this two-semester course, students participate in a comprehensive training experience designed to thoroughly familiarize them with the tutoring process by means of videotape viewing, readings, discussion, and supervised practicum in the local elementary schools.

Prerequisite: Faculty recommendation and successful CORI/SORI clearance

Offered: Fall-Spring

Note: Contact Hours: For one credit (15 hrs): 6 classroom hours, 9 tutoring hours. For two credits (30 hrs): 6 classroom hours, 24 tutoring hours. For three credits (45 hrs): 6 classroom hours, 39 tutoring hours. Once a student has completed the six classroom hours of instruction in one semester, subsequent enrollment in the Reading Tutorial Practicum consists of 15, 30, or 45 supervised tutorial hours with no further formal classroom hours necessary. Students may receive work-study money if they qualify.

1–3
English for Speakers of Other Languages/English for Academic Purposes (ESOL/EAP) Credits
ESL010
English for Speakers of Other Languages I: Basic

ESL010 introduces the literate non-native speaker of English to the four skills, reading, writing, speaking and understanding spoken English, to develop a basic command of Standard American English.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: 4 non-degree credits

4
ESL100
Academic Speaking and Listening for English Learners

This course is designed to help students who are learning English develop their listening and speaking skills for interactions in academic settings in an English-speaking college environment.

Prerequisite: a CPT ESL listening test score of or greater than 40 or ESL010 or permission of the instructor

Semester Offered: Summer

1
ESL102
English for Speakers of Other Languages II: Intermediate

This course is a continuation of ESL010 (ESL I) and provides the intermediate level non-native English speaker with instruction in reading, writing, speaking and understanding spoken English. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to read and discuss standard college English works; ability to recognize and produce correct patterns in sentences and paragraphs; and the ability to combine paragraphs into correct and coherent compositions.

Prerequisite: ESL010 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ESL201
English for Speakers of Other Languages III: Advanced

This course is a continuation of ESL102 ( ESL II) and provides the advanced level non-native English speaker with instruction in reading, writing, and speaking, and understanding standard American English. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to read and write essays from college-level English works; ability to produce short essays and coherent compositions; and the ability to discuss materials written at the college level.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ESL102 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Entrepreneurship Credits
ENT108
Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process of creating businesses, non-profits and other new ventures. Students learn about the roles and attributes of successful entrepreneurs while undergoing a rigorous self-assessment process. Students interview a local entrepreneur, participate in case studies related to new ventures and have the opportunity to learn directly from a variety of speakers invited to class to share their start-up experiences, including ethical dilemmas and other obstacles they will face as entrepreneurs.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
Environmental Technology Credits
ENV101
Survey of Environmental Technology

A history of Environmental Technology is presented with emphasis on the current applications of the best available technology. The diverse environmental career opportunities are presented through field trips and guest speakers.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENV105
Quantitative Methods for Environmental Analysis

Designed for environmental technology students. Emphasis is on mathematical skills essential in scientific applications. Mathematical and statistical skills using a scientific calculator and computer will be used to assess current environmental data sets. Conclusions will be drawn based on these data assessments.

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035

Offered: Fall

3
ENV115
Environmental Chemistry

Discussion and study of the relationship between chemistry and contemporary environmental topics, including energy and the environment, air, soil, oil, solid and water pollution, and agricultural chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHM106

Offered: Fall

3
ENV118
Introduction to Environmental Science

A study of environmental interactions and the impact of humans on the environment. The use of natural resources, including land, air, water, mineral and biological resources, is examined. Local and global examples are presented to enable students to better understand and evaluate contemporary environmental problems and the application of science to their solution. The corresponding laboratory component provides students with the practical experience of measuring, recording and interpreting environmental data. Interdisciplinary knowledge is used to understand environmental problems. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores; Co-requisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
ENV122
The Process of Environmental Management & Decision-Making

This course is an introduction to the process of environmental management and decision-making. It incorporates a modular approach to instructing students on issues of environmental protection throughout Cape Cod by focusing on wetlands, habitat, land-use planning, and conservation. Students explore watershed management and remediation, focusing on wastewater, water supply and storm water issues. Students also learn about environmental health and safety, focusing on prevention, compliance and environmental mediation, and zoning issues.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENV125
Coastal Ecology

This is an introduction to coastal marine habitats, their species, and their ecological relationships. Students develop an understanding of the diversity of living things along the Cape Cod shoreline. Students shall also examine the wide diversity of habitats and their differences on the Cape. This course includes extensive lab and field work.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ENV126
Coastal and Shelf Oceanography

This course provides an overview to the oceanography of coastal and shelf systems. Throughout the course, the interdisciplinary aspect of oceanography are emphasized by covering many areas of study including biology, chemistry, geology, physics, history, and ecology. Students gain a basic understanding and appreciation of the effects of natural marine processes as well as consequences of human activity. Emphasis is on nearshore, shallow-water systems.

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and ENV118 and ENV125

Offered: Spring

3
ENV127
Projects in Coastal Ecology

This is an advanced class focusing on field studies of coastal marine habitats and their species composition. Students are involved in extensive field and lab surveys of several sites on Cape Cod. They examine both the biological and physical features of the coastal marine environment. Students work in small teams collecting physical (slope, particle size) and chemical data (pH, salinity, nitrates), plant and animal surveys, and recording data to analyze in the classroom.

Prerequisite: ENV118 and ENV125

Offered: Fall

3
ENV135
Coastal Zone Management Laws and Regulations

This introductory course will cover the issues and regulations related to the coastal environment and its resources. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach that combines the scientific issues with their economic and social impact. Topics covered include nitrogen loading, fisheries management, aquaculture, wastewater impact, marine sanctuaries, public access, renewable energy projects, coastal flooding and erosion, and sustainable development. Current research will be examined and several guest speakers will present.

Prerequisite: ENV118 and ENV125

Offered: Spring

3
ENV140
Introduction To Water: Concepts & Technology

A study of the physical and chemical properties, human uses, hydrology and ecology of groundwater, marine, estuarine, standing and flowing water systems, focusing on the science of current water-related issues and the methods and technologies used in their solution. The basic concepts of water quality monitoring, water supply, and wastewater technologies will be emphasized. Some field trips may be required.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
ENV145
Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation

The course covers the specific processes, problem-solving and operations in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Students are taught the operating parameters, data collection and analysis; the decision-making and process control of complex biological systems; and maintenance fundamentals required of Grade 4 Certification level operators.

Prerequisite: ENV118 and ENV140

Offered: Varies – at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

4
ENV146
Water Supply

This course is a study of the principles and practice of water supply. This course will provide an introduction to the physical and chemical principles of drinking water supply, the functioning of related equipment and support systems, and the responsibilities required to safely operate and maintain a water supply system. May be taken for 4 CEUs by current employees in the Waterworks industry.

Prerequisite: ENV118 and ENV140

Offered: Spring

3
ENV158
Occupational Health and Safety (OSHA) through Hazardous Waste Management

This course covers issues involved in the determination, treatment and reduction of hazardous wastes and the federal regulations regarding handling of hazardous wastes, the risks to society from hazardous wastes, and treatment techniques employed to mitigate their effects. The techniques covered include thermal, physico-chemical, biological and landfill disposal as well as the ways and means of reducing the generation of hazardous wastes. 40-hour (OSHA) HAZWOPER certification is awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
ENV163
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) I

GIS I is a two-part course that focuses on the designing and building of a map using a relational database. The course will focus on the principles of database management as related to cartography and GIS. The students will be provided with the fundamental topics for each subject in class.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENV164
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) II

The fourth and final course in the GIS certificate is designed to build on the concepts developed in Geographic Information Systems I. This course will proceed through the concepts of GIS in the lecture. Students will choose a project and apply the concepts to the project as the course proceeds. Projects are chosen from many topics in GIS analysis: coastal zone management, hazardous materials management, environmental planning, urban planning and site assessment.

Prerequisite: ENV118, ENV160, and ENV161

3
ENV170
Renewable Energy Sources

This course provides an overview of renewable energies including solar energy, wind power, hydropower, biomass, hydrogen, and fuel cells. Students learn the basic principles of each technology for new and existing construction. They study government regulations, analyze renewable energy systems, calculate savings, backup energy, and financing options. They investigate the potentials of renewable energy technologies to help solve environmental and economic problems with society.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
ENV171
Energy Efficiency & Conservation Methods

This course provides students with the information to identify and explain all of the energy efficiency/conservation methods available for energy use reduction. Energy-consuming facilities, both domestic and commercial, are analyzed by the students for energy efficiency opportunities. The students calculate energy savings and environmental impacts for most energy efficiency methods in order to identify and assess energy conservation opportunities. In addition, the students demonstrate the appropriate usage of energy monitoring and measuring equipment commonly used by energy specialists and energy auditors.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall

3
ENV172
Commercial Energy Audits

This course offers an interactive approach for students to understand, compile, and conduct and an energy audit for commercial facilities. It has been customized for the Cape Cod region and will emphasize regional issues.

Prerequisite: ENV171

Offered: Spring

3
ENV173
Introduction to Solar Energy

Students in this course gain an understanding of our solar energy resource and how it can be utilized for a variety of energy demand applications in residential, commercial, and municipal buildings. The benefits and limitations of various solar energy technologies that are commonly used to produce heat, hot water, and electricity are examined. Students learn how to properly site, size, design, and specify solar hot water and solar electric systems. Students also learn how to perform an economic and environmental analysis of proposed systems.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Spring

3
ENV177
Introduction to Wind Energy

This course provides an in-depth introduction to wind power as a sustainable form of energy. It examines the history, current applications, and future of wind power. Students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental science behind harnessing useable energy from the wind. The course looks at the process for siting, developing, constructing, operating, and maintaining wind energy projects of different scales – from home and small commercial to municipal and utility scale.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

3
ENV178
Photovoltaic Installation

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of photovoltaic (PV) system installation and maintenance procedures. The class is divided between classroom based lectures/activities and project based activities involving the installation of a residential scale PV system. Students who complete this course are eligible to take the North American Board of Certified Energy Practioners' Entry Level Certificate of Knowledge of PV Systems Examination (for an additional fee.)

Prerequisite: ENV173

Offered: Varies

3
ENV179
Solar Thermal Installation

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of solar thermal system installation and maintenance procedures. The class is divided between classroom based lectures/activities and project-based activities that involve the installation of a residential scale solar thermal system. This course is approved by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practioners and counts towards the training requirements for becoming a certified Solar Thermal System Installer (additional field experience is required to be eligible for certification).

Prerequisite: ENV173

Offered: Varies

3
ENV180
Small Wind Installation

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of small wind-electric system installation and maintenance procedures. The class is divided between classroom based lectures/activities and project based activities that involve the installation of a residential-scale wind system. This course is based in part on the Task Analysis for the North American Board of Certified Energy Practioners (NABCEP) Small Wind Energy Systems Installer Certification.

Prerequisite: ENV177

Offered: Varies

3
ENV181
Introduction to Green Building

This course provides a framework for making practical design and construction decisions that are environmentally responsible by focusing on residential design for Cape Cod, including new construction and renovations/additions. Topics include site orientation, building science fundamentals, passive solar design, water and energy efficiency, healthy indoor environments, green materials and resources, and certification programs in the industry. Students learn to prioritize numerous types of green building strategies by examining case studies and field experiences.

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025 and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Varies

3
ENV201
Environmental Instrumentation

This course exposes the student to a variety of analytical techniques and instruments utilized in environmental chemical analysis. It is designed to couple theory of equipment operation with a basic understanding of the chemical principles involved. The laboratory time is divided between practical hands-on benchwork and field experiences. (1 class hour/4 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: ENV105 and ENV115

Offered: Spring

4
ENV260
Environmental Technology Internship/Cooperative Experience

This course involves a range of hours of monitored field experience that is consistent with the student's career goals. Students keep journals and write proscribed "analysis" papers as they progress during the course of the semester. Time commitment is based on the number of credits (70 hours per credit).

Prerequisite: (ENV118 or ENV170) and permission of instructor

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

1–4
Film Credits
COM120
Introduction to Film

This course provides the student with an appreciation of the film experience. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theories, and genres which influenced the technical and aesthetic development of the medium. Concepts are illustrated through the viewing of classic American and international cinema. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM221
The American Film

This course provides the student with an appreciation of the film experience through a survey of American film from historical, aesthetic, economic, technological, critical, and appreciative viewpoints. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theories, and genres. Concepts are illustrated through viewing classic American cinema. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM222
International Cinema

This course is a survey of the development of international cinema from historical, aesthetic, economic, technological, critical, and appreciative viewpoints. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theories, and genres. (4 class hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM224
Documentary Film

Filmmaker John Grierson defined documentaries as "the creative treatment of reality." This course looks at the history and development of the documentary film, with a particular focus on the varying notions of truth, art, reality. Students in this class will learn how to look at documentaries with a critical eye by not only studying the subject, but also by participating directly in the making of an actual documentary video.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

3
Fire Science Credits
FSC103
Fire Fighting Tactics And Strategy

This course is concerned with basic fire fighting tactics and strategy; methods of attack; preplanning of fire problems including necessary equipment and manpower. Some fire problems will be presented for analysis and study, consistent with accepted practices from authoritative sources. The concepts of I.C.S. and R.I.C. will be discussed throughout the class.

Prerequisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC105
Hazardous Materials

This course reviews the fundamental physical and chemical principles which govern the behavior of Hazardous Materials. Specifically, the course deals with identifying hazardous materials and the hazards of solids, dusts, water reactive materials, liquids, gases, toxic materials, plastics, corrosives, oxidizing agents, explosives, radioactivity, LP gases, cryogenics, general hazards and electricity. Handling, transporting, storage and recommended fire fighting practices within extreme fire hazard areas are discussed. Laboratory demonstrations illustrate and supplement the class work.

Prerequisite: CHM106 or CHM101 or CHM109

Offered: Varies

3
FSC107
Hydraulics For The Fire Service

This course is concerned with the fundamentals of hydraulics and fluid mechanics as they relate to the firefighter and individuals involved in Fire Protection. Subjects to be studied include: principles of fluid statics, fluid motion, water supply testing, fire pump operation and fire suppression systems.

Prerequisite: FSC150 or FSC100 and MAT030 or MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
FSC108
Fire Investigation And Evidence

This course will cover the methods used in determining the causes and circumstances of fire. The collecting and preserving of evidence will be covered; also, the preparation of evidence for court.

Prerequisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC109
Fire Department Management And Planning

An exploration of organization principles with emphasis on fire department organization; a study of history, types, methods, and principles of fire department organization; insurance and fire defense, personnel and equipment, water supply, departmental functions, and administrative problems.

Prerequisite: FSC114

Offered: Varies

3
FSC110
Fire Code And Ordinances

This course will review the codes which influence the field of fire prevention including the fire prevention regulations of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (527 CMR). Also included will be Chapters 48, 143 and 148 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth as well as the Massachusetts Building Code, and the codes of the National Fire Protection Association.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FSC114
Fire Company Management

A study of scope and functions of the fire company officer in the fire department. Topics discussed include: the role of the fire service, departmental procedures, administrative and management procedures, training, public relations, tactics and strategy, and fire prevention.

Prerequisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC115
Introduction To Technical Rescue

The student will receive instruction in the basic concepts of technical rescue. An explanation of related equipment, regulations and procedures to supervise and conduct technical rescue operations will be explained.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FSC120
Introduction to Incident Management

This course introduces the philosophy of emergency scene management, the National Incident Management System (N.I.M.S.), planning and preparation in anticipation of a likely emergency, and management of specific types of emergency situations including a review of lessons learned from historical incidents. This course is intended to acquaint students with the basic management tools needed to operate as a command officer at the scene of an emergency or disaster.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FSC130
Shipboard Firefighting

This course is designed to give the students an understanding of the maritime industry by providing information on maritime terminology, ship construction, firefighting shipboard fire protection systems, and shipboard firefighting. The course focuses on the necessary tactics and strategies needed to deal with a maritime fire as well as the various agencies that can provide assistance in dealing with a shipboard fire. Students will be given a tour of a ship, during which time the systems will be explained and the shipboard firefighting problems discussed.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FSC150
Principles of Emergency Services

This course provides an overview of fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems, fire strategy, and tactics; and life safety initiatives.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
FSC151
Fire Prevention

This course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of the fire prevention. Topics include history and philosophy of fire prevention, organizations and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use and application of codes and standards, plan review, fire inspections, fire and life safety education, and fire investigation.

Co-requisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC152
Fire Protection Systems

This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers.

Co-requisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC153
Building Construction for the Fire Protection

This course provides the components of building construction related to fire fighters and life safety. The elements of construction design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

Co-requisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC154
Principles of Fire and Emergency Service Safety and Survival

This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives focusing on the need for cultural and behavioral change throughout the emergency services.

Prerequisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: varies

3
FSC155
Fire Behavior and Combustion

This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread and are controlled.

Co-requisite: FSC150 or FSC100

Offered: Varies

3
FSC200
Special Topics in Fire Science

This course will serve to deepen student's knowledge of subjects in Fire Science introductory courses and explore timely issues outside the established curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory level Fire Science course

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

1
Fitness Credits
FIT105
Decision Making In Health

The course will examine information, concepts, and knowledge for influencing changes in health-related behavior so that the student may make decisions that will affect him/her personally throughout the life cycle. The course will include in-depth study and discussions in the areas of health as it affects people physiologically, psychologically and sociologically. It will assist the students in their beliefs, attitudes, and values toward their own personal health in a rapidly changing environment.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FIT115
Fitness And Sports Nutrition

This course will provide information about the relationship between nutrition and fitness/sports performance. It is of interest to professionals who advise athletes and to the general population interested in improving health and physical performance through sound nutritional practices. Topic examples include carbohydrate metabolism, weight management, body composition assessment, eating disorders, ergogenic aids, pre-/post- and competition meals.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FIT117
Personal Fitness

Students assess their current level of health-related fitness and develop a physiologically sound program of physical activity to meet their needs and interests. The course emphasizes the concept of physical fitness as a lifetime commitment and stresses the acquisition of specific knowledge, skills and motivation necessary to meet this commitment.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
FIT122
Diet & Exercise

This course introduces students to the benefits of aerobic exercise and a well-balanced diet. Students are encouraged to continue an exercise regimen outside of class and incorporate principles of nutrition into their diets. Discussion about and participation in exercise are included. The student evaluates current personal fitness levels and identifies areas of needed improvement. Additionally, lifestyle habits such as food intake verses energy expenditure will be discussed to assist in setting diet and exercise goals.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT123
Circuit Training

In this course students learn the benefits of circuit training as part of a well-rounded fitness regimen. Emphasis will be placed on circuit training fundamentals, safety, and proper form. Students will participate in physical exercise for aerobic conditioning and flexibility training.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT133
Lifeguard Training (LGT)

The course will afford students the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills associated with safety, supervision and rescue in an aquatic environment. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills designed to save the life of another in an aquatic emergency. Those successfully completing the course will be certified by the American Red Cross in Lifeguard Training (R94) (including First Aid certification), CPR for the Professional Rescuer and Waterfront Lifeguarding. LGT Certification indicates the minimum skills training for a person to qualify as a non-surf lifeguard. Students must be able to pass a swimming proficiency test – completed at 2nd class meeting.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
FIT142
Survey Of Lifetime Activities

The course will survey the fundamental skills, specific knowledge, and relative values of selected leisure sports. The course will focus on the examination of personal skills, interests, and needs as criteria for the selection of and participation in leisure sports and the constructive use of leisure time. Class format will include an introduction to participation in selected leisure sports, discussion of class activities and related leisure concepts, and small group and individual assignments.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
FIT164
Pilates Mat I

Pilates Mat I is designed to expose the student to the Pilates method of body conditioning with a unique system of stretching and strengthening exercises developed over 90 years ago by Joseph Pilates. Pilates strengthens and tones muscle, increases flexibility, and develops better posture. The student learns the basic beginning sequence of exercises and gains an understanding of muscle groups as they relate to Pilates.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT167
Kripalu/Hatha Yoga I

A five-week course designed to expose the student to basic yoga philosophy, breathing exercises, simple postures and relaxation techniques. The student also learns about the major muscles and bones, as well as the circulatory and nervous system of the human body in relation to yoga.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT168
Kripalu/Hatha Yoga II

A five-week course designed for the student who has completed FIT167. New postures will be introduced, and postures will be held for longer periods of time. Additional breathing techniques will be incorporated. Students will develop a deeper understanding of how the body functions, and how yoga affects these functions. Relaxation techniques will be further developed.

Prerequisite: FIT167

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT169
Pilates Mat II

An eight-week course designed for the student who has completed FIT164 Pilates Mat I (FIT 164-40 or FIT 164-41). This course will offer the natural progression to the intermediate/advanced Pilates exercises. The student will continue to focus on the importance of the breath and core stabilization. Additional focuses will be several stretching techniques and knowledge of the muscle groups that help promote proper posture.

Prerequisite: FIT164

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
FIT170
Adventure Concepts

This course explores the use of the adventure paradigm (model) as a means of promoting effective intrapersonal and interpersonal behavior. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course examines the relationship of risk, goal setting and skill development/application to personal and social growth. Adventure activities such as rappelling, group problem-solving tasks, and individual initiative projects are used to provide a common experiential base for the discussion of course concepts.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
French Credits
FRN100
Conversational French

This conversational French course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of French to the four basic skills necessary to developing a working knowledge of French: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on speaking and understanding spoken French.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requistite ENL108

Offered: Varies

3
FRN101
Elementary French I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary French sequence for beginning students of French. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken French. This course is not intended for students whose native language is French.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN102
Elementary French II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college elementary French sequence. It is for beginning students of French. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken French. The purpose of this course is to provide students a sound basis for learning French as it is spoken and written today. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: FRN101 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN122
Immersion Study in French

Students study French language and civilization in a Francophone country. Traditional class work is supplemented by cultural activities and field trips.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

 

3
FRN201
Intermediate French I

This course is for students who have completed one year of Elementary French or two years of high school French. Students will read, discuss, and write about francophone culture and language in French.

Prerequisite: FRN102 or 2–4 years of high school French

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN202
Intermediate French II

Intermediate French II is for students who have completed Intermediate French I or three to four years of high school French. Students will read, discuss and write about francophone culture and language in French. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: FRN201 or 3–4 years of high school French

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN301
Advanced French: Survey of French Literature I

This course is a survey of selected French literary works. These selections serve as a basis for classroom discussion and writing assignments. Conversation and composition polish and develop students' abilities in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Prerequisite: FRN202

Offered: Fall

3
FRN302
Advanced French: Survey of French Literature II

This course is a survey of selected contemporary French literary works. These selections serve as a basis for classroom discussion and writing assignments. Conversation and composition polish and develop students’ abilities in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Prerequisite: FRN202

Offered: Spring

3
Geography Credits
GEO101
American Geography

Comprehensive, systematic study of population, natural resources, and potentialities of the United States and Canada. Evaluates these nations against a background of world economics and political affairs.

Prerequisite: None; ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment socres recommended

Offered: Varies

3
GEO104
Geography: Culture And Environment

This course examines the differences and spatial interactions of various cultures, technologies, and regions. The economic and social possibilities of local, extra-local, and regional environments are viewed from the perspective of their resident human populations. The concept of a world region is introduced and used as framework by which to understand the contemporary issues associated with cultural geography. The basic concepts of cultural geography are introduced and the analytical tools of cultural geography are reviewed. The successful student is conversant with the basic tools and concepts of cultural geography, the analytical perspectives of the discipline, as well as the broad cultural patterns of the cultural regions of the world.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral & Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
German Credits
GER100
Conversational German

This basic conversational German course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of German to the four basic skills necessary to developing a working knowledge of German: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on speaking and understanding spoken German.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
GER101
Elementary German I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary German sequence for beginning students of German. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four-skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken German. This course is not intended for students whose native language is German.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER102
Elementary German II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college Elementary German sequence. It is for beginning students of German. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken German.

Prerequisite: GER101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER126
Austria: Vienna & Salzburg

This one-week study tour emphasizes the history, art, and culture of Austria in the early 1900s. Students come to understand the political and artistic dynamics of a world caught between the traditions and power of an old empire and the beginnings of the industrial era, which brought forth a new generation of artists who celebrated life in te Jugendstil form of art and architecture. Students must participate in all study tour activities.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
GER201
Intermediate German I

This course is for students who have completed one year of elementary college German or two to four years of high school German. Students will read, discuss, and write about German culture and language in German.

Prerequisite: GER102 or 2–4 years of high school German

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER202
Intermediate German II

This course is for students who have completed Intermediate German I or three to four years of high school German. Students will read, discuss and write about Germanic culture and language in German. Students must have college level-reading and writing skills in their native language. Students are expected to be able to greet and respond to greeting and introductions, engage in conversation, express likes, dislikes and needs, describe and compare, narrate a short anecdote using past, present, and future tenses, write simple paragraphs, and read and understand some details and important ideas in authentic texts.

Prerequisite: GER201

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
Health Sciences Credits
DTC102
EKG Technician

This 30-hour course prepares the student to function as an EKG technician and assist with Holter monitoring and stress testing. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be eligible to take the national certification exam for EKG technicians.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

2
DTC104
Fundamentals of Phlebotomy

This course is a combination of lecture and lab which presents the theory, application and procedures of phlebotomy skills. The student will obtain knowledge of specific anatomy, safety, quality control, Point of Care Testing, and processing of specimens. Applicants must attend an information session and advising session prior to admission.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

6
DTC204
Phlebotomy Practicum

A course combined with completion of DTC104 prepares the student to function as a phlebotomist and meets the eligibility criteria of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) for certification. This course is a combination of 120 hours of internship with 3 hours scheduled on-campus seminars.

Prerequisite: DTC104 with passing grade of 75% or better, successful demonstration of skill proficiency and recommendation of faculty

Offered: Fall, Spring

2
EMS101
Emergency Medical Technician: EMT

This course is designed to train participants to work with existing agencies that provide emergency medical services. Included in these services are first-aid procedures, operation of emergency equipment, and knowledge of communications systems associated with emergency and rescue operations. Students gain knowledge and skills relating to medical and emergency technology within laboratory and clinical settings. Students are eligible for state and national certification upon successful completion of course and state examination.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

5
EMS203
Advanced Pre-Hospital Training Program: Paramedic I

This course covers the roles and responsibilities of the EMT/Paramedic including history and physical assessment, pathophysiology and management of shock, cardiac, respiratory, neurological, and abdominal emergencies. Class includes an overview of emergency medical services communication systems. Students must be currently certified as an EMT. Laboratory experience is interwoven with classroom instruction. Applicants are required to attend an information session. Class extends beyond usual semester dates. Special tuition is charged.

Prerequisite: ENL025 and (MAT020 or MAT025) or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall

10
EMS204
Advanced Pre-Hospital Training Program: Paramedic II

Students learn assessment and management of emergencies including obstetrics, gynecology, and trauma in pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations. Laboratory experience is interwoven with classroom instruction. Class extends beyond usual semester dates. Special tuition is charged for this course.

Prerequisite: EMS203

Offered: Spring

10
EMS210
Paramedic Clinical Experiences

Clinical rotations provide opportunities for observation and practice of procedures, skills, and experiences. Skills and procedures in the clinical rotations are completed while working with preceptors in a variety of clinical settings including hospitals, urgent care centers, and other health care settings. The experiences and skills attained by the student are based upon specific skill requirements and specific hours spent in rotation.

Prerequisite: EMS203 and EMS204

Offered: Varies

4
EMS220
Paramedic Capstone Field Internship

Students participate in a 200-hour field internship. Field internships provide an integration of didactic, lab and clinical skill mastery coupled together with principles of emergency care in the field. Students respond to emergency medical service calls and perform paramedic skills as part of an advanced life support (ALS) ambulance crew under the supervision of a field preceptor. The required 200 hours include 30 ALS patient care incidents. Students must successfully document ten (10) ALS incidents of the required thirty (30) in which they act as the team leader while being properly supervised.

Prerequisite: EMS203, EMS204 and EMS210

Offered: Varies

2
HEA120
Stress Management for Optimal Health

A comprehensive approach to the subject of stress and its effects on health and disease. Stress concepts are addressed within a holistic framework appreciating the physiological, psychological, emotional, social, and spiritual aspects of individuals. Common physical, intra-personal, interpersonal, environmental, and global stressors are assessed. Current stress interventions are introduced. Emphasis is on integrating knowledge from several disciplines to provide an informed scientific foundation for stress management.

Prerequisite: None. PSY101 recommended

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies an Interdisciplinary Studies general education requirement.

3
HEA130
Standard First Aid and Basic Life Support (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)

The course provides participants with a basic knowledge of First Aid skills for treatment of illness or injury, as well as instruction in Basic Life Support for the health care provider (CPR) according to the guidelines of the American Heart Association (AHA). Upon successful completion of the course, students receive AHA certification in both Standard First Aid and CPR.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
HEA132
Advanced First Aid & Emergency Care/Basic Life Support/First Responder

The course provides comprehensive and advanced coverage of first aid skills for treatment of illness or injury, as well as Basic Life Support/Healthcare Provider (BLS/HCP) for the professional rescuer. Upon successful completion of the course, the participants receive certification as a First Responder in accordance with Massachusetts General Law chapter 111: Section 201 and Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider in accordance with the standards established by the Committee on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care of the American Heart Association.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
HEA134
Essential Skills for the Health Professional

In this introductory course, students explore basic concepts surrounding career opportunities in the health professions while learning about and understanding the basic skills required for entry into a health career. Understanding one's role in a health career, making effective decisions to manage a personal career plan, assessing personal qualifications, interests, knowledge, values and skills necessary to succeed in a health career are key to this course. The student develops essential work habits desired by employers in the health care field.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Semester Offered: Fall, Spring

1
HEA135
Introduction to Complementary Healing Practices

In an experiential teaching/learning format, this course provides an overview of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) health practices now being utilized by a growing number of health-care consumers. Presentations and demonstrations by practitioners in areas such as herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine/acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy, are an integral part of the course. The history and development of selected CAM practices and systems, how they work, and their relationship to traditional Western medicine are discussed. The concept of “wellness” versus disease treatment, and the mind-body connection are explored.

Prerequisite: None

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer

3
HEA200
Pharmacology

This course addresses the interaction between substances used as drugs and human body systems. Knowledge of natural sciences, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics between chemical entities and receptors, and pharmacological concepts of administration, dosage and patient safety are stressed. Emphasis is placed upon mechanisms of action, side effects, and drug interactions.

Prerequisite: Accepted into the Nursing program. Co-requisites: NUR107 and BIO108 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
HEA201
Nutrition

Principles of nutrition are discussed in detail and related to many different settings. Topics of discussion include: My Pyramid; nutritional labeling; the (6) nutrients and how each is ingested, digested, metabolized, and transported throughout the human body; nutritional counseling of many different types of patients, such as the cancer patient, geriatric patient, infant, child, and adolescent patient; and food safety. An introductory course for individuals interested in pursuing a Dietetics major.

Prerequisite: CHM109 and BIO107

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
HEA202
Essentials of Pharmacology for Allied Health Professionals

This course provides instruction in concepts and application of pharmacological principles. Foci of the course will be on drug classifications, principles and procedures of medication administration, mathematical systems and conversions, calculation of drug problems and medical and legal responsibilities of the allied health professional.

Prerequisite: BIO105 & BIT103

Offered Spring

2
MAC101
Fundamentals of Medical Assisting

This introductory course for the Medical Assisting certificate is designed to bring together a learning community of students to explore the role of the professional medical assistant, the health care team, the history of the profession, and credentialing requirements. They will learn to obtain patient histories, vital signs, principles of infection control, etc. Prior to admission to this course the student must attend an information session and an advising session.

Prerequisite: BIT103 & BIO105

Offered: Fall

3
MAC204
Medical Assisting Clinical Procedures and Clinical Practicum

This seven-credit course is designed to teach basic medical assisting clinical skills and provide practical experience in a clinical setting to complement the clinical and office skills required by the credentialing agency (Commission for Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs – CAAHEP). The course is divided into lecture, laboratory practice, clinical practicum, and seminar.

Prerequisite: MAC101; Co-requisite: MAC205

Offered: Spring

7
MAC205
The Administrative Medical Assistant

This course prepares students to perform the administrative functions of a medical assistant. Course topics include the following: an overview of the healthcare industry, client/patient relations and communication, health information management, medical practice management, and professional workplace behavior. Students acquire skills in a medical office software package, meet CAAHEP/MAERB required administrative competencies, and explore ethical/legal issues in modern medicine.

Prerequisite: MAC101; co-requisite: MAC204. Enrollment in the Medical Assisting Program.

Offered: Spring

3
History Credits
HIS103
U.S. History to 1865

This introductory survey of United States history from the European invasion of North America through the mid-19th Century period of the Civil War and Reconstruction addresses major social, cultural, political, and economic developments with emphasis on their relation to contemporary United States institutions and trends.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS104
U.S. History since 1865

This introductory survey of United States history from Reconstruction to the present addresses major social, cultural, political, and economic developments with emphasis on their relation to contemporary United States institutions and trends.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS108
The U.S. Since 1945

This course is a contemporary history of the United States since World War II at home and abroad. It provides an in-depth investigation of the events, developments, personalities, and meanings of the changes of the past years.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS119
World History I

This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from the rise of civilization to 1500 Current Era (CE) in Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania, the Middle East, and the Americas. The course highlights issues in geography, trade, religious and cultural movements, and social and political change that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS120
World History II

This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from 1500 Current Era (CE) to the present in Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania, the Middle East, and the Americas. The course highlights issues of geography, trade, religious and cultural movements, and social and political change that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS160
European History I

This course provides a general overview of major topics of European history from ancient times up to 1600 Current Era (CE). Students focus on cultural, religious, political, and economic developments that formed the basis of modern European culture and society and influenced the Americas and other regions.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS162
European History II

This course provides a general overview of European History from 1600 to the present. Students focus on cultural, religious, political, and economic developments that formed the basis of modern European culture and influenced the United States and other nations.

Prerequisites: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS201
History of China

The course is a historical study of China’s history and culture going back to the first Chinese dynasty through the Communist Revolution of 1949 and beyond. Students will examine the historical, economic, and social factors that developed Chinese civilization. The transformation of China from an Imperial State to a Communist Republic will be closely examined in order to gain a better appreciation of how contemporary Chinese view the world today, particularly the U.S. The course will also provide a foundation for the continued study of a broad range of Asian topics.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

3
HIS206
Ancient History

This survey course covers the development of the earliest civilizations of the Near East and Europe, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, including their major historical periods: cultural contributions; and social, political, and economic organization.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS207
Medieval History

Students survey of the elements of medieval history from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the coming of the Renaissance. This course emphasizes the development of the medieval church, the growth of feudalism and the origins of its decline, and the seminal ideas which continue to affect our civilization.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS215
Women in United States History

This course is a survey of the roles and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. The contributions of women to the development of the United States are examined with particular emphasis upon multiculturalism, legal status, economic opportunities, reproduction and family life.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS216
History of Japan

The course is an historical study of Japan’s history and culture from ancient times to the present. Students will examine the historical, economic, and social factors that developed Japanese civilization. The remarkable transformation of Japan from a feudal society led by an aristocratic class of samurai to a modern republic similar to modern 19th century Western nations will be closely analyzed. The course will also include close scrutiny of the events pushing Japan into WW II as well as Japan’s dynamic post- WW II recovery, to include a significant economic boom. The course will provide a foundation for the continued study of Japan as well as a broad range of Asian topics.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

3
HIS217
The Civil War

This course addresses a crucial era in United States history: the Civil War. The class covers three major areas of historical inquiry: a) the events that led up to the war including sectionalism and slavery; b) the war itself including an overview of military events, the political and economic impact of war, and the social history of war; and c) Reconstruction, the process by which the nation sought to rebuild after the war.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS227
History of the Middle East

This course explores the development and interactions of cultures in the region now referred to as the "Middle East" – Southwest Asia – and adjacent regions that today share many aspects of culture. The course covers the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, travels through the rise (and fall) of empires that spread through the region (such as the Persian, Islamic, Mongol, Ottoman and Safavid empires), explores the period of direct and indirect Western (European and American) intervention, the rise of fundamentalism and the Arab Spring.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a HIS100-level course

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS228
Women In European History

This course explores women's real and perceived roles and status in society from Ancient Greece to modern times. The course focuses on women's roles in the development of European history. Students explore how history has impacted the lives of women of different social and cultural groups and how women have impacted history.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS241
Selected Topics in History

This course serves as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in History introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
HIS255
History of Vietnam

The course is a historical study of Vietnam with a specific focus on the U.S. involvement there during the Vietnam War. Students will study Vietnam’s history and culture going back to ancient times and develop an understanding of the significant impact that both had in the U.S. involvement there.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS258
African American History

This survey course addresses African Americans in United States history, thought, and culture from slavery to the present. Topics addressed include slavery and emancipation, civil rights, religion, arts and literature, and gender.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
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Homeland Security Credits
HSC101
Introduction to Homeland Security

This course is a comparative examination of the relationship of the criminal justice system to business and industrial security, with a focus on the role private security plays in Homeland Security. The course closely examines the role of private security in protecting people and assets.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basis skills assessment score or permission of instructor

Offered: Fall

3
HSC102
Maritime Security

This course provides an examination of regulations, vulnerabilities, and threats relating to commercial maritime transportation, including cargo and seaport security, as well as issues of privacy, stowaways, terrorism, and international disputes.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: HSC101

Offered: Fall

3
HSC103
Management of Incidents

This course is a basic incident management course that could apply aspects of local and state governments, but concentrates on the law enforcement aspect. The course examines overall management techniques, coordination of rescue efforts, National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Unified Command System.

Prerequisite: HSC101

Offered: Spring

3
HSC104
Cybercrime

This course provides students with basic information on how commonly encountered high-technology crimes are committed as well as basic investigation strategies including the collection of evidence and computer forensics focusing on the network. Crimes dealing with computers, telephones, check-reading machines, credit card machines, and other technology are discussed. Issues dealing with jurisdiction and legislation to expressly criminalize cybercrime are discussed.

Prerequisite: HSC101 or BIT187

Offered: Spring

3
Horticulture Credits
HOR101
Plant and Soil Science

This course provides an in-depth introduction to plant classification, anatomy, physiology, nutrition and reproduction. Chemical and physical properties of soil as well as the relationship between soils and plant growth are emphasized. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT020 or MAT025, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
HOR102
Entomology And Plant Diseases

A survey of the common insect pests and pathogens of ornamental plants, including a review of the basic principles of entomology and plant pathology. Topics include biological diversity, taxonomy, morphology, physiology, ecology, behavior, insect/human relationships, pesticides, biological control, and the causes, nature and control of plant pathogens. A 'least is best' philosophy is emphasized, regarding use of pesticides in controlling the various competition for plant health. Integrated plant management is the basis for control strategy.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
HOR103
Woody Plant Identification And Culture

The identification and culture of native and ornamental plants and shrubs are discussed. Plant requirements, characteristics and placement, as well as susceptibility to diseases and pests are reviewed. Methods of pruning, fertilizing and special needs are discussed.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
HOR104
Turf Management

An introduction to the establishment and maintenance of turfgrass. Turfgrass and weed identification, cultural practices and maintenance are included. Insect and disease life cycles and control are reviewed. Integrated pest management (IPM) is emphasized.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
HOR105
Equipment Maintenance And Operation

Introduction and training in the repair, maintenance and safe operation of golf course and landscaping equipment. Maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures of small and large gasoline and diesel engines and basic welding are emphasized. Students learn the techniques of mowing a golf green and are instructed in the operation of a front end loader tractor. Methods and maintenance of irrigation systems are also included.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
HOR106
Horticulture Practicum

Work in an area of horticulture in a business, government or non-profit organization for at least 150 hours to receive practical training in the horticulture field. Students have an opportunity to develop and pursue challenging work experiences which relate directly to their individual career plan. A minimum of 150 hours in horticulture-related employment and a bi-weekly meeting with the Horticulture Program Coordinator.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in an Horticulture certificate program.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Pass-Fail

1
HOR107
Floral Design

This course is an introduction to the identification, care, handling and designing of floral crops. It makes the student aware of the various business challenges of a retail florist operation and makes them capable of successfully dealing with those challenges. Emphasis is placed on preparing the student with the skills to work as a floral designer.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
HOR201
Herbaceous Plant Identification and Culture

The identification and culture of herbaceous annuals, perennials, groundcovers and vines are discussed. Students will review propagation, placement and pest vulnerability of herbaceous plants commonly used in the landscape.

Prerequisite: HOR101

Offered: Spring

3
HOR202
Landscape Design And Construction

Introduction to landscape design including site analysis, estimation of costs of installation, selection of site furnishings, and construction of walks, steps and walls.

Prerequisite: HOR103

Offered: Spring

3
Hospitality Management Credits
CUL150
Fundamentals of Professional Cooking

This course is an introduction to the management of food preparations, sanitation, and costing. Principles of cookery and their relation to methods of preparations, nutrition, cost control, kitchen organization, and management are emphasized.

Co-requisite: HRM111

4
CUL180
Baking I

An introduction to the principles of professional baking including: the chemistry of baking, terminology, scaling and measuring, and equipment use. Preparation includes a variety of breads and pastries with emphasis on proper production methods, baking methods, and final product presentation and display. Students are responsible for required supplies and materials. (1 class hour/4 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
CUL210
Dining Room Operations & Service

This course provides an introduction in and practical application into the operation of a dining room with emphasis on quality guest service. Topics include: "front of the house" organization, methods of table service, menu terminology, table arrangement, requirements for supplies and equipment, suggestive selling techniques, and revenue control and analysis. Personnel issues include hiring, training, writing personal resumes, and strengthening interview skills. Students serve meals prepared in a restaurant setting during the course of the semester. Culinary Arts Certificate students should take CUL210 concurrently with CUL220. (2 class hours/4 laboratory hours).

Prerequisite: CUL150 or HRM140; Co-requisite: CUL220

Offered: Spring

4
CUL220
Advanced Culinary Arts

A continuation of CUL150, this capstone course builds upon basic skills and introduces more advanced culinary skills; ethnic, regional and international cuisine, and stresses communication in an operating food production environment. Additionally, students are required to develop and execute menus developed in class, including purchasing and menu specifications, proper ordering, receiving and storage of foods, and analysis of business activity from a monetary perspective. (2 lecture hours/4 lab hours)

Prerequisite: HRM 140 or HRM150/CUL150

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Limited to CAC students only.

4
HRM111
Foodservice Sanitation

This course provides the future hospitality manager with certification in Applied Foodservice Sanitation from the National Institute for the foodservice industry. A state-mandated certificate is awarded at the successful completion of the National Foodservice exam.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

1
HRM130
Food And Beverage Management

This course covers the essential of food and beverage controls. An awareness of management objectives is developed through the examination of organizational structures of food service. Students study specific topics such as menu pricing, break-even analysis, and cost-volume-profit theory. Emphasis is placed on forecasting and achieving profitability.

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025) and ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

3
HRM140
Introduction to Hospitality Management

Students are introduced to the operation of businesses in the hospitality field. Emphasis is on the development-cycle of the industry, current trends, and analysis of management responsibilities.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

3
HRM170
Casino Management

This course introduces the student to the history of the gaming industry and the basics of casino management. The course emphasizes ethics in the gaming industry, the economics of the industry, and its interface with hotel and restaurant organizations. An overview of the industry, gaming control law, and career opportunities are highlighted.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

3
HRM215
Lodging Operations

This course focuses on front desk operations and management's relationship to the front office. Methods of revenue management are applied to areas of price structure, occupancy patterns and income. Legal contract and liability issues specific to the lodging industry are also covered.

Prerequisite: HRM140

Offered: Fall

3
HRM216
Event Planning and Management

This course offers an introduction to the researching, planning, coordinating, marketing, management, implementation, and evaluation of special events. Through the study of relevant communication and management theory, as well as practical hands on experience, students will learn about the wide range of components that go into the execution of events of all sizes. Specific areas of study include food and beverage service, laws and permits, security, advertising and promotion, and logistics. Students may not earn credit for COM216.

Prerequisites: (COM103 or COM202) or (CUL150 or HRM140)

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a General Education Elective.

3
HRM230
Hospitality Marketing

Marketing of the hospitality industry is studied through the exercise of strategic marketing planning. Understanding of the marketing concept and how it is applied to the mission statement, research techniques, situation analysis, positioning, and the tools of marketing.

Prerequisite: HRM140 and ENL101

Offered: Spring

3
HRM250
Special Events & Operations Management

As the capstone course for HRM students, the focal point of this course is the planning, organizing and execution of special events that include a theme, specialized menu, entertainment, dining room decorations, and uniforms reflected in the actualities of the hospitality industry. Beyond food purchasing, production and services, students will be responsible for revenue control and analysis. Group work, as a class and in individual specialized groups, emphasizes completing assigned tasks. Students will serve meals prepared in a restaurant setting during the course of the semester. (2 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Limited to HRM students.

Prerequisite: CUL150 or HRM140

Offered: Spring

3
HRM262
Hospitality Cooperative Work Experience

The core content of this course involves 300 hours of monitored field experience which is consistent with the student's career goals. Students will keep journals and write proscribed 'analysis' papers as they progress during the course of the semester.

Prerequisite: 9 credits in CUL/HRM curriculum

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
Humanities Credits
HUM102
Humanities: Perception through Arts

This course is an introduction to humanistic studies; it examines works of the human spirit (in music, painting, philosophy, sculpture, architecture, drama, poetry) which have influenced our civilization and who we are as individuals.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
Human Services Credits
HUS101
Introduction to Human Services

This course is an introduction to the historical, political and social aspects of Human Services. Topics include themes and purposes of Human Services, theoretical orientations, history and evolution of the Human Services profession, skills and intervention strategies for generalist practice, the helping process, working within a system, child and family services, mental health, substance abuse and treatment. Also covered are professional concerns including ethical standards, decision making, confidentiality, and clients' rights.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HUS104
Introduction to Alcohol & Substance Abuse

Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse explores the causes and consequences of addiction as it relates to all aspects of society. This course briefly discusses the impact on the healthcare system, family system, and legal system. Historical implications and response to changes over time are reviewed. Topics regarding intervention, treatment, education, and prevention are discussed. Competencies and requirements for licensure in Massachusetts are explained. Addiction issues related to diverse populations are presented.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
HUS206
Human Services Practicum

The course establishes learning opportunities in the field of human services. Based on National Community Support Skill Standards students are required to spend 100 clinical hours in a human services agency. In addition, students participate in a weekly class to process clinical experiences; expand skills, including sensitivity, empathy, confrontation and problem-solving. The course also addresses goal setting, case management and client assessment. CORI/SORI required. By permission of Human Services Coordinator.

Prerequisite: By permission of the Human Services Coordinator. Corequisite: PSY101, HUS101, and COM103

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
HUS207
Advanced Human Services Practicum

Students are required to spend 100 clinical hours in the role of a human service provider and participate in the 12 National Community Support Skill Standards in a Human Services setting throughout the semester. In addition, students participate in a weekly class to process clinical experiences with clients, services provided, and agency interaction. The advanced experience and course addresses innovative clinical situations in individual and group settings. CORI/SORI required. By permission of Human Services Coordinator.

Prerequisites: By permission of Human Services Coordinator and HUS206; Co-requisites: ENL101, HUS229 & PSY208

Semester Offered: Varies

4
HUS208
Advanced Addictions Practicum

The class establishes learning opportunities in the field of addictions. Students spend 100 hours throughout the semester in a human services addictions agency to apply the knowledge, values, concepts, and skills of the addiction profession. Students participate in a weekly class to process clinical experiences and focus on skill building in treatment planning, counseling, client engagement strategies, client education, consultation with other professionals and documentation. One hundred (100) hours in a clinical setting are required. CORI/SORI required.

Prerequisites: Permission of Human Services Coordinator; HUS104, HUS207, PSY208

Semester Offered: Varies

4
HUS229
Introduction to Social Welfare

This course includes an analysis of the conceptions of social work, social welfare and social service delivery systems from both historical and contemporary perspectives. This course includes critical examination of the social justice mandate as well as issues of cultural diversity that effect and inform the practice of social work. Social work is presented as a profession that integrates science, clinical awareness and human understanding in practice intervention, policy development and research. Contemporary issues and problems in various fields of social work practice are explored with particular emphasis on the role of the generalist social work practitioner.

Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC106

Offered: Varies

3
HUS230
Mental Health, Substance Abuse & Families

Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Families reviews assessment, intervention, and treatment in dual diagnosis families, from a systems model. Topics include needs, concerns, and resistance in individual members and the family as a whole. Discussions revolve around the dynamics of codependency; a comparison of approaches to family recovery; treatment techniques appropriate to the different phases of family recovery; and strategies to help prevent family relapse.

Prerequisite: (PSY101 or SOC106), HUS101, and HUS229

Offered: Spring

3
HUS231
Treatment Modalities in Human Services

This course introduces the most commonly used and widely accepted treatment and relapse prevention methods in the mental health and alcohol/substance abuse field. The class explores the role of the social service worker and treatment modalities utilized in the school, prison, outpatient, inpatient, and day treatment areas as they apply to the different special populations. The populations discussed include children, adults, elderly, dual diagnosis, incarcerated, and addiction. Service learning is used for experiential learning.

Prerequisite: PSY101, HUS101, HUS229

Offered: Spring, Fall

3
HUS270
Social Work: Diversity, Cultural Competence & Social Justice

This course introduces the student to the life-long learning process of developing culturally competent social work/human services practice and addresses issues of power and privilege. Working with diverse groups that include; ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship status, gender identity, socio-economic level, age, and faith will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills for culturally competent practice through self-reflection, experiential learning, and critical analysis of privilege and social inequalities.

Prerequisites: HUS229 and ENL102

Offered: Varies

3
Information Technology – Database Credits
BIT250
Database Design and Development

Students study and apply the functions of a database management system (DBMS), file systems, the relational model, query by example (QBE), introductory structured query language (SQL), entity relationships, normalization techniques, database design, and multi-user and network considerations. In addition, database administration, advanced database design, disaster recovery, and current trends in database technology are reviewed. Students develop advanced database applications using a Windows-based application such as Microsoft Access.

Prerequisite: GIT150

Offered: Fall

3
BIT251
SQL & SQL Server for Developers

Students learn the essential Structured Query Language (SQL) skills necessary to become a Database Administrator (DBA.) SQL Server and Management Studio are used to manipulate data, implement database designs, manage database security, and use database features including scripts, functions, and transactions.

Prerequisites: GIT150

Offered: Spring

3
GIT150
Database Applications

Students acquire an in-depth, hands-on understanding of a PC-based relational database. Using Microsoft Access, students create and edit tables, forms, and reports; sort, query and graph data; and attach, import and export data to/from other applications. Data normalization techniques are studied. Students, working individually and in teams, design and implement database applications. This course prepares students for the Microsoft Office User Specialist Access exam.

Prerequisite: GIT108 or GIT110 or equivalent skill level in Windows

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Information Technology – General Credits
BIT112
Information Technology Foundations

This survey course introduces students to all aspects of the Information Technology (IT) industry and is intended for students wishing to make informed choices for careers in IT. Students receive an overview and understanding of the core aspects of Information Technology including Network and Infrastructure Systems, Information Support and Services, Interactive Media and Programming and Software Development. The focus of this course is an understanding and appreciation of the duties of information technology professionals and how each IT area relates to and interacts with the others. Upon completion of this course students have the knowledge necessary to make educated choices about continued study in IT as well as understanding the impact of technology on society and organizations of all types.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
BIT113
Microcomputer Hardware

Students learn the anatomy of a microcomputer by disassembling, assembling, upgrading and customizing a PC. Students evaluate purchasing vs. building a PC. The role of the BIOS and CMOS in the POST and BOOT processes is explored. System boards, processors, memory, and peripherals, including input, output, multimedia, network and data devices are studied. Students learn troubleshooting, safety, basic operating systems procedures, and security and preventive maintenance techniques. Customer service is stressed. This course covers the hardware material for the Comp TIA A+ certification exam.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BIT115
Operating Systems

Students develop competency installing, configuring, upgrading, and supporting microcomputer-based operating systems. Students learn about memory management and system optimization techniques. System support software utilities are reviewed. Students study evaluation and selection methodologies for operating systems. Command line usage, file and disk management, system performance, device drivers, security, network support, hardware peripheral support and help topics are included. Communication and professionalism are stressed. This course covers material for CompTIA A+ 220-602 exam.

Prerequisites: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BIT260
Information Technology Field Project

Students have a practical, hands-on experience developing a real-world computer application. This course must be taken in conjunction with an advanced-level IT course. 1 hour per week of consultation with the assigned faculty member. A minimum of 15 hours of independent work.

Prerequisite: Permission of IT Coordinato

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

1
BIT261
Information Technology Cooperative Work Experience

The student works in an information systems office for 150 hours to gain practical training in one of the varied aspects of information technology. All students in Information Technology tracks are encouraged to take a cooperative work experience. Limited to students enrolled in the Information Technology program.

Prerequisite: at least 2 semesters of Business and IT courses and/or comparable practical experience. Permission of IT Coordinator

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
GIT110
Microcomputer Applications Software

This course focuses on the use of the microcomputer in various business settings. A lab/lecture environment is used to enable students to learn the Windows operating system and four commonly used software packages selected from applications in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. Students are introduced to the software and then progress through various challenging assignments, including integrating applications. Basic concepts in Internet usage, including electronic mail, are an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and (GIT101, GIT102, or 30wpm)

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
GIT180
Introduction to the Internet

This course is designed to provide the student with both a theoretical and practical overview of the Internet. Students will be prepared to perform confidently in business, educational, and personal areas of interest using many Internet services including: Telnet, File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Newsgroups, and the World Wide Web (WWW).

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
Information Technology – Networking Credits
BIT116
IT: Linux

This course provides students with hands on working knowledge of Linux using both the graphical interface and command line, and covering the major Linux distribution families with an emphasis on Kali Linux. Topics include various tools and techniques commonly used by end users and Linux system administrators to achieve their day-to-day work in a Linux environment. This course is designed for computer users who have limited or no previous exposure to Linux.

Prerequisites: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
BIT187
Introduction to Networks (Cisco 1)

Using both simulated and real equipment, students learn principles and practices of planning, designing, installing, maintaining, upgrading, and troubleshooting client-server networks and how they differ from peer-to-peer networks. Emphasis is placed on Small Office/Home Office (SOHO) and small Local Area Network (LAN) network structures through Open System Interconnection (OSI) and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) modeling, IP addressing, Ethernet protocols, and media as a foundation to networking. Concepts are enforced through the basic configuration of routers and switches. This is the first of two courses needed to prepare for the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) exam/Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 1 (ICND1).

Co-requisite: BIT115

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BIT236
Wireless Networking

Using a hands-on approach, students learn the fundamentals of planning, installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting a network supported by unbounded media. Assuming no prior knowledge of wireless networks and devices, students are prepared to apply and support wireless technology in personal, LAN, and WAN networks. Many of the skills required for the Certified Wireless Network Administration (CWNA) exam are covered while exploring all current IEEE wireless protocols.

Prerequisite: BIT187

Offered: Fall

3
BIT237
Windows Server Administration

Using a hands-on approach, students learn current Windows Server architecture, installation, configuration, upgrading, proactive maintenance, security and environmental issues, troubleshooting and problem determination and disaster recovery. Concepts covered include the differences between versions of Windows, installation, protocols, devices and drivers, disk and data storage, user and computer accounts, domain user and group accounts, group policy, and file system access and security. This course begins preparing students for MCSA/MCSE Certification Exams.

Prerequisite: BIT187.

Offered: Fall

Note: Open for credit to student who have completed BIT223; not open for credit to students who have completed BIT223 and BIT234

3
BIT239
Routing & Switching (Cisco 2)

This course describes the structure of small networks connected to the Internet for communications through operations of routers and switches. Concepts are enforced through the configuration of basic functionality for routers and switches using common routing protocols, Virtual LANs (VLANs) and inter-VLAN routing for both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students use simulation tools and network equipment to analyze, configure, verify and troubleshoot networking protocols and services. This is the second of two courses needed to prepare for the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) exam/Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 1 (ICND1).

Prerequisite: BIT187

Semester Offered: Varies

3
BIT240
Security+

This course covers fundamental principles for securing a network and managing risks. Using a hands-on approach, students learn access control, identity management and cryptography, as well as a selection of appropriate mitigation and deterrent techniques to address network attacks and vulnerabilities. This course prepares students to take the CompTIA Security+ certification exam. Prior to starting this course, students are required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT187 or Network+ Certification (Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years)

Offered: Varies

3
BIT241
IT: Ethical Hacking

This course includes all aspects of ethical hacking and information systems security auditing programs. The course focuses on the latest security threats, advanced attack vectors, and supplements all learning information with practical hands on demonstrations of the latest hacking techniques, methodologies, tools, tricks and security measures. Students scan, test, hack and secure their own systems. Topics include Intrusion Detection, Policy Creation, Social Engineering, DDOS Attacks, Buffer Overflow and Virus Creation. This course helps prepare students to take the CEH certification. Prior to starting the course, students are required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT240 or a Security+ Certification; co-requisite: BIT116 or a Linux Certification (Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years)

Offered: Varies

3
BIT242
IT: Advanced Ethical Hacking I

This is the first in a series of two courses that teach students to comprehend the creation of sophisticated attacks, discover vulnerabilities and formulate exploits for fully patched, fully hardened systems (also known as penetration testing). Students learn to discover 0day exploits. Students discover a working exploit for Microsoft Windows and Linux vulnerabilities as well as begin to reverse engineer a Windows Binary. This course begins to prepare students to take the CEPT (Certified Expert Penetration Tester) and the ECSA (EC-Council Certified Security Analyst certification). To fully prepare for these certifications, both BIT242 and BIT243 must be completed successfully. Students are required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT241 or a Certified Ethical Hacker Certification. Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years.

Offered: Varies

3
BIT243
IT: Advanced Ethical Hacking II

This is the second in a series of two courses that teach students how to create sophisticated attacks, and exploit fully patched, fully hardened systems (also known as penetration testing). Students create 0day exploits. Students create a working exploit for Microsoft Windows and Linux vulnerabilities as well as reverse engineer a Windows Binary. This course continues to prepare students to take the CEPT (Certified Expert Penetration Tester) and the ECSA (EC-Council Certified Security Analyst certification). To fully prepare for these certifications, both BIT242 and BIT243 must be successfully completed. Prior to starting this course, students are required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT242 or a CEH Certified Ethical Hacker Certification. Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years.

Offered: Varies

3
BIT244
IT Security: Reverse Engineering

Students learn to analyze situations dealing with malware, artifacts, programs or anything that can destroy information. Students gain the ability to reverse binaries efficiently. This course completes the preparation for the CREA (Certified Reverse Engineering Analyst) certification exam. Prior to starting the course, students will be required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT243 or a CEPT Certified Expert Penetration Tester Certification. Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years.

Offered: Varies

3
BIT245
IT Security: Penetration Testing

This course provides students with hands-on experience and knowledge of the most prominent attack vectors. Students mimic the skills of an advanced hacker in order to find and protect network and system flaws.This course completes the preparation for students to take the CEPT (Certified Expert Penetration Tester) certification exam. Prior to starting the course, students are required to sign an agreement stating all knowledge learned in this course will not be used for illegal or malicious purposes.

Prerequisites: BIT244 or a CREA Certified Reverse Engineering Analyst Certification. Certifications must have been earned within the past 5 years.

Offered: Varies

3
BIT246
Scaling Networks (Cisco 3)

This course provides students with hands-on advanced working knowledge of routers and switches using both simulated and real equipment. Students develop the knowledge and skills required to work with the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches used in small to medium sized networks. Students work with IPv4 and IPv6 networks using well known routing protocols such as OSPF, EIGRP and STP, and on switches configured with VTP, DTP, HSRP, or extended VLAN’s. This is the first of two courses needed to prepare for the Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2) and the third of four courses for the CCNA.

Prerequisites: BIT239

Offered: Varies

3
BIT247
Connecting Networks (Cisco 4)

This course provides students with hands-on professional working knowledge of Wide Area Networking (WAN) technologies and network services using both simulated and real equipment. Students develop the knowledge and skills required to select, configure and troubleshoot network devices and appropriately utilize WAN technologies. Virtual Private Network (VPN) operations are viewed from the perspective of operations in a complex network. This is the second of two courses needed to prepare for the Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2) and the last of four courses for the CCNA.

Prerequisites: BIT246

Offered: Varies

3
Information Technology – Office Technology Credits
BIT103
Medical Terminology

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed yet no previous knowledge of these topics is necessary.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic assessment skills

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
BIT202
Standard Office Procedures

Students develop the concepts and skills needed to function effectively in an administrative assistant position. The course includes the following: human relations; customer service; communication services; meetings, minutes, and agendas; travel arrangements and itineraries; financial statements and reports; professionalism, machine transcription; and resumes and interview techniques.

Prerequisite: GIT110

Offered: Spring

3
BIT203
Medical Office Procedures

Students prepare for immediate and long-term success as administrative assistants and medical assistants in a medical office environment. The course includes the following: an overview of the healthcare industry, client/patient relations and communication, health information management, medical practice management, and professional workplace behavior. Students acquire skills in a medical office software package and explore ethical/legal issues in modern medicine.

Prerequisite: GIT110 and BIT103

Offered: Spring

3
BIT207
Medical Coding and Billing

This course is designed to teach the student the current medical coding practices used for third-party billing. ICD-9-CM and CPT coding will be covered along with an in-depth study of insurance companies, Medicare, insurance claim forms, accounts receivable, and legal issues relating to medical record keeping.

Prerequisite: BIT103

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BIT208
Advanced Medical Coding and Billing

Students continue their mastery of diagnostic and procedural coding and billing through complex case studies and use of authentic medical records. Students are introduced to International Classification of Diseases ICD-10CM and other diagnosis coding systems such as DSM-IV. Code auditing for regulatory compliance is emphasized.

Prerequisite: BIT207

Semester Offered: Varies

3
BIT209
Pharmacology for Medical Coding

Students learn basics of pharmacotherapy as it relates to the duties of a medical coder. Drug classifications and matching drugs to common conditions and laboratory findings are emphasized.

Prerequisite: BIT103

Semester Offered: Varies

1
GIT101
Typing I

Students learn to master the computer keyboard, develop speed and accuracy, and prepare basic business documents.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
GIT102
Computer Keyboarding

Learn to touch-type correctly on a microcomputer. Attention is given to developing accuracy and, as time permits, increasing speed. Hands-on preparation of a letter and a research paper are included.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Pass-Fail

1
GIT108
Windows Operating Systems

This course provides an introduction to the Windows operating system and the hardware of a typical microcomputer system. Skills needed to navigate the Windows desktop, manage disks and files, and use Windows applications are explored. The WordPad and Paint programs are utilized as office tools. Students become proficient users of pointing devices.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
GIT125
Spreadsheet Applications for Business

Students gain a conceptual and practical understanding of electronic worksheets utilizing the spreadsheet, data management, graphics, and application development components of a Windows-based spreadsheet program. Students complete a variety of exercises designed to develop mastery of the major components of the spreadsheet program as it is used in the business office environment. This course covers the material for the Microsoft Office User Specialist Excel Expert Exam.

Prerequisite: GIT110 and (ACC111 or ACC201)

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
GIT220
Advanced Word Processing Application

Students learn proficiency using many of the advanced functions and special features of a comprehensive word processing package. Course content includes: tabs, print styles and sizes; macros; data manipulation; basic mathematical computations; special text features like outline, columns, and merges; and graphic elements. GIT110 and GIT220 cover all the material for the Microsoft Office Specialist Word Expert Certification exam.

Prerequisite: GIT110

Offered: Spring

3
Information Technology – Software Development Credits
BIT175
Visual Basic

Students learn the design processes and development tools available in Visual Basic using the .NET Framework. This knowledge is applied to build and execute Windows-based applications. Screen design, process controls and software interfacing are covered in addition to Visual Basic syntax.

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and GIT110

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
BIT266
Application Development for Mobile

This course offers a practical introduction to the mobile device app development industry. Students learn about the operating systems of mobile devices, limitations and challenges of developing mobile applications and create and submit an app to the app marketplace.

Prerequisites: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores and (CSC110 or CSC120 or BIT175)

Semester Offered: Spring

3
GIT160
Foundations of Gaming

This course offers a thorough and insightful introduction to the game development industry. Students learn about the evolution of game development and examine content creation and the concepts behind the development of story, character, environment, level design, user interface, and sound. Game Platforms, level design, interface design, project management, serious games, game accessibility, and online applications are explored.

Prerequisite: ENL108 and (MAT030 or MAT035)

Offered: Fall

3
Information Technology – Web Design Credits
BIT221
Web Site Development Practicum

Student teams work with faculty, departments, or non-profit organizations planning, designing and implementing interactive, dynamic web sites. This course has both service-learning and interdisciplinary facets and may be taken for honors credit.

Prerequisite: GIT183, GIT184, and BIT283

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
BIT284
Javascript & JQuery Web Scripting

Building on HTML, DHTML, and CSS skills, students learn to use Javascript and JQuery to create dynamic web sites. XML, AJAX, JSON, and Blogger and API's for YouTube, Twitter, and Flickr are introduced.

Prerequisite: GIT183

Semester offered: Varies

3
BIT286
PHP and MySQL for Web Development

Students build on JavaScript, programming, database, HTML, DHTML, and CSS skills. This course introduces the web developer to the PHP scripting language and the MySQL database system and enables students to plan and develop end-to-end, database-driven web sites and applications.

Prerequisites: GIT183 and GIT150

Semester offered: Varies

3
GIT183
Web Site Design and Scripting

Learn the basics of web site design including text formatting, graphics, animations, color, layout, linking. This project-based course requires the student to develop a well-designed web site using HTML, DHTML, and Javascript.

Prerequisite: GIT110

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
GIT184
Web Authoring and Graphic Tools

In this hands-on, project-based course, students learn to do the following: create dynamic, media-rich web sites using a graphic user interface tool; design and prepare graphics for the web using Adobe Photoshop; and use Adobe Acrobat to produce and distribute documents over the web.

Prerequisite: GIT110

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Interdisciplinary Studies Credits
COL101
The College Experience

This theme-based seminar is designed to help students develop the skills and confidence necessary to succeed in college, the world of work, and life. In this course, students will examine theories and practices associated with academic success. Areas of study include education and career planning, study skills, effective communication, critical and creative thinking, information literacy, personal management, development of community and awareness of diversity, technology, and leadership. Modeled on the "workshop format" in which students learn by doing, students will be actively engaged in group activities and team projects.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
EXP101
Experiential Learning Internship and Seminar

This course combines an internship experience, where students work in an industry/occupation of interest, with a seminar focusing on practices associated with successful job performance and career advancement. Students reflect upon their experience and examine their potential for career satisfaction and success through interest, skill, value and personality assessments. Students study workplace systems and gain an understanding of professional behaviors and communication practices. Students are responsible for securing placement; the Office of Career Services and Experiential Learning is available to assist with the process. Site placement typically requires 8–15 weeks of preparation; students should plan accordingly.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and interview with instructor

Offered, Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: 3 credits (100 hour internship) or 4 credits (150 hour internship)

3–4
HON200
Honors Colloquium

Honors students experience an interdisciplinary, team-taught colloquium on a current global issue. Students refine their research, writing, critical thinking, and collaborative learning skills as they investigate the topic from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Students complete research projects integrating their findings and present results to an audience. Presentation of Honors research in the Honors Colloquium is required at both the local Honors Reception and at the Annual Undergraduate Research Conference at the Commonwealth Honors College in Amherst.

Prerequisite: Twelve successfully completed credits at Cape Cod Community College which include ENL101 and three Honors credits and a 3.2 GPA.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
Italian Credits
ITL100
Conversational Italian

This basic conversational Italian course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of Italian to the four basic skills necessary to develop a working knowledge of Italian: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on speaking and understanding spoken Italian. This course counts toward graduation but does not fulfill a general education distribution requirement.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ITL122
Immersion Study in Italian Language/Civilization

Students study Italian language and civilization in an Italian speaking country. Forty hours of traditional class work is supplemented by cultural activities and field trips.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
ITL125
Conversational Italian II

This course is designed to provide continued practice and mastery for the non-native speaker of Italian in the four basic skills necessary to developing a working knowledge of Italian: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing.

Prerequisite: ITL100

Semester Offered: Spring

3
Laboratory for Transfer Students Credits
BIO199
Special Laboratory in the Life Sciences

A laboratory portion of existing physical science courses that provides a laboratory experience for only those students who are transferring in credits for life sciences courses that do not match the traditional four-credit format (3 credits lecture, 1 credit laboratory). The life sciences course laboratory selected must closely match the transferred life science course and must have the explicit approval of both the laboratory instructor and the Dean of Science, technology, Mathematics, and Business. Only if seating is available will students be allowed to register for the appropriate laboratory section during the ADD period. Students who transfer in more than one life science course may register twice (but, not for the same laboratory experience) for BIO199. Students with laboratory deficiencies in life sciences courses taken at CCCC will not be allowed to register for BIO199, since the life sciences courses at CCCC are designed and taught such that the laboratory and lecture are non-separable.

Prerequisite: Completion of the non-lab portion of a transferred life sciences course and permission of the Academic Dean

Offered: Varies

1
PHY199
Special Laboratory in the Physical Sciences

A laboratory portion of existing physical science courses that provides a laboratory experience for only those students who are transferring in credits for physical sciences courses that do not match the traditional four-credit format (3 credits lecture, 1 credit laboratory). The laboratory selected must closely match the transferred physical science course, and must have the explicit approval of both the laboratory instructor and the Dean of Science, Technology, Mathematics, and Business. Only if seating is available will students be allowed to register for the appropriate laboratory section during the ADD period. Students who transfer in more than one physical science course may register twice (but, not for the same laboratory experience) for PHY199. Students with laboratory deficiencies in physical sciences courses taken at CCCC will not be allowed to register for PHY199, since the physical sciences courses are designed and taught such that the laboratory and lecture are non-separable.

Prerequisite: Completion of the non-lab portion of a transferred physical sciences course and permission of the Academic Dean.

Offered: Varies

1
Latin Credits
LAT100
Introduction to Latin

This course introduces students to the Latin language and Roman culture. Learning Latin grammatical structures helps students gain an understanding of English grammar and syntax. Emphasis is on the etymology and morphology of words, and the practice of derivations and cognates allows students to enrich their vocabulary. This language study occurs within the context of Roman culture, which influenced the western world.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Literature Credits
ENL120
Introduction to Children's Literature

Students survey works drawn from the rich variety of children's literature. They analyze selections from major genres, discuss historical and contemporary issues, and develop practical ways of involving children in literature.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL135
The Short Story and Human Values

This course examines the ways in which short fiction reflects and shapes the human experience. Works examined feature a variety of cultural traditions, allowing students to consider which human values are universal and which may be culturally bound. Students examine the ways in which stories are used to preserve and challenge social institutions such as marriage/family, education, justice, and religion.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satasfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL150
World Mythologies

Students study myths from the great cultures of the world. Through readings, discussions, research projects and presentations, students explore the universal values conveyed by these stories from different world cultures. Students discover the symbolism in the events and details of these stories, and they understand mythmaking as a primary human activity.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL200
Cape Cod Literature

A survey of four centuries of Cape Cod literature, including native American, journals and records of discovery and settlement, fishing and whaling literature, Cape women's literature, Thoreau's nature writing, and contemporary fiction, poetry, and essays. The course explores the Cape's rich literary heritage, how it reflects the region's history, culture, and environment, and examines the underlying theme of human and natural change. Field trips and journal keeping are integral to this course.

Prerequisite: ENL102 or permission of instructor with submission of writing sample

Offered: Varies

3
ENL201
World Literature I

Major literary works are studied from the ancient world through the Enlightenment that have both described and shaped western civilization.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/odd

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL202
World Literature II

Through reading Chinese folktales, Ottoman Empire traditional stories, and European treatises from the Enlightenment, students explore the literary sources of our diverse modern world cultures. An examination of historical texts from revolution to romanticism in western Europe and the Americas, lyric poetry of the Urdu, as well as multiple voices of myriad peoples, provides a framework for studying and comparing universal values through twentieth century texts.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL203
British Literature through the Eighteenth Century

Designed for students who have successfully completed both semesters of English Composition and who wish to become familiar with literature that has helped shape contemporary culture. This course surveys representative works and writers in English literature through the 18th century.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL204
British Literature from the Romantic Age to the Present

Designed for students who have successfully completed both semesters of English Composition and who wish to become familiar with literature that helped shape contemporary culture, this survey course examines representative works and wirters in British literature since the mid-eighteenth century.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring (odd numbered years)

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL205
American Literature to 1890

Students examine major contributions to the development of American culture and ideals from the Pilgrims to Henry James.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

 

3
ENL206
American Literature Since 1890

Students examine the rise of Realism and Naturalism through fiction and poetry.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL207
Shakespeare

Students read and discuss representative works by Shakespeare, considering them for their literary value, their relevance to Elizabethan culture, and their expression of our common human experience.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/odd

3
ENL210
Exploring Modern Poetry

Students engage in reading, discussing, and writing about poems and poets of the 20th and 21st centuries. Consideration of modern poetry as both literature and art includes individual projects and presentations. Selections are drawn from both major as well as lesser known and culturally diverse poetic voices.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL214
The Contemporary Novel

This course introduces the student to the major characteristics of the novel in both form and content. Contemporary novels are examined as one index of cultural values. Students read, write about, and discuss a selection of novels written during the last fifty years.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/odd

3
ENL215
World Religions in Literature

World Religions in Literature provides students the opportunity to read, discuss and write about the religions of the world as subthemes in short stories, poetry, novels and literary essays. Included is intensive reading, analysis of world literature and its influence on its society, consideration of literary criticisms, and discussion of values/beliefs evident in literature with particular attention to religious themes.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/odd

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL217
Exploring the World of Science Fiction

Exploring the World of Science Fiction is a course that provides students the opportunity to read, discuss, and write about the genre of science fiction in literature. Texts include short stories, poetry, novels, film, and nonfiction. Emphasis is given to reading and analysis of the genre of science fiction and its influence on society and literature.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL218
The Arthurian Legend

This course focuses on the origins, development, structure, and meaning of the Arthurian legend. Students read, discuss, and write about seminal Arthurian texts, and explore connections to mythology, Celtic culture, and European history.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/odd

3
ENL219
Masters of Horror

Masters of Horror is a literature course that provides students the opportunity to read, discuss and write about the genre of horror in literature. Texts include short stories, poetry, novels, film, and nonfiction. Emphasis is given to reading and analysis of the genre of horror and its influence on society and literature.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL228
Women Writers

This course examines traditions and themes especially important in the development of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama written by women, such as "Women Alone," "Women and Sexuality," "Women and Work," "Women and War," "Women in Love." An initial overview describing the emergence of women as authors is provided to establish topical and historical contexts. Readings, drawn primarily from moderm texts, offer a diverse range of authors, genres, styles, and cultures.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL290
Selected Topics in Literature

Selected Topics in Literature provides students the opportunity to read, discuss and write about a literary specialty. Subjects may include African-American literature, Nobel Prize winning literature, a literary genre, a single author, or a single major work. The course will include intensive reading, analysis of the literature and its influence on society, consideration of criticism of this literature, historical study of the author or authors involved, and discussion of the cultural context of the literature. Specific content will depend on the particular subject chosen for study.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Varies

3
Marketing Credits
MKT100
Marketing

This course focuses on the basic principles, problems, and practices in marketing. Students learn marketing strategies, design of marketing mixes, and market planning in a changing environment.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
MKT103
Advertising

Students study and analyze the principles and practices of advertising including its functions in our society, its role in business, its challenges, and the creative opportunities that exist in the field of advertising. Emphasis is placed on how and why advertising influences consumer behavior, including a study of the various types of media used.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
MKT106
Consumer Behavior

Students learn about the various processes and facets of consumer motivation and behavior, including the internal and external influences on buyer behavior.

Prerequisite: MKT100

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
MKT112
Customer Service: Concepts & Applications

This course provides an overview of customer service concepts and terminology and exposes students to various customer service challenges. Students learn to identify different types of customer behaviors, determine customer needs through active listening, become effective verbal and non-verbal communicators, hone telephone customer service skills, learn how best to handle difficult customers, become aware of how to offer customer service within a diverse organizational environment, take steps to encourage customer loyalty, and practice service recovery.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Mathematics Credits
MAT120
Mathematics for Elementary and Early Childhood Educators I

This course is designed for students planning to teach Elementary or Early Childhood Education. Students develop an understanding of the mathematical content of numbers and operations at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary and early childhood educators. Topics include: critical thinking skills; sets and operations on sets; the whole number system and its operations; place value and arithmetic models; mental math; algorithms; pre-algebra; factors, divisibility, prime numbers, elementary number theory, and their applications; the integers and its operations; clock arithmetic, fractions and rational numbers; decimals and the real number system; ratios, rates, and proportions; and percents. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and ECE100 or EDU101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
MAT121
Mathematics for Elementary and Early Childhood Educators II

This course is designed for students planning to teach Elementary and/or Early Childhood Education. Students develop an understanding of the mathematical content of geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability at the deep level required for successful early childhood and elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary and early childhood educators. Topics include: Two- and three-dimensional Geometry; Measurement; Data Analysis; Single Variable Statistics; Probability. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT120

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT140
Survey of Mathematics

Designed for liberal arts students. Emphasis is on mathematics as the study of patterns and on mathematical thinking as the making and proving of conjectures. Topics: logic, number sequences, functions and graphs, large numbers and logarithms, geometry, symmetry and regular figures, methods of counting, probability, introductory statistics, finance, and topology. The history, philosophy, and applications of mathematics are interwoven. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT150
Elementary Statistics

Students are introduced to descriptive and inferential statistics focusing on conceptual understanding and statistical literacy. Topics include: techniques for organizing and presenting data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, one- sample hypothesis tests, and correlation and regression. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT165
Finite Mathematics

An introduction to selected applications of mathematics in business, management, social sciences, and economics. Topics include: descriptive statistics, graphing of functions, simple and compound interest, functions and their applications, probability and elements of mathematical modeling using first and second degree polynomials. The course is designed for students in career programs. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT175
College Algebra

This is an entry-level mathematics course for students interested in a STEM track. Topics include: domain and range, piecewise functions, complex numbers, quadratic inequalities, graphs of polynomial and rational functions, fundamental theorem of algebra, transformations of graphs, inverse functions, solving exponential and logarithmic equations, Gaussian elimination, and translations of conics. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are emphasized throughout the course. This course prepares students for Precalculus with Trigonometry or Applied Calculus. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT045 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semesters offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

4
MAT180
Applied Calculus

This course is designed for students planning to apply mathematics to management and social science topics. Topics include a review of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their application to business, an introduction to limits, continuity and the derivative, and applications of the derivative.

Prerequisite: MAT171 or MAT175

Offered: Varies

3
MAT185
Business Calculus II

This course is designed for students seeking a background in mathematical modeling and applied calculus and/or intending to pursue transfer study in business administration or in social science disciplines requiring calculus. The topics covered include: the integral and its applications, and techniques of integration. Additional topics are selected from probability distributions, differential equations, multivariable calculus, and Taylor Series.

Prerequisite: MAT180

Offered: Varies

3
MAT195
Precalculus with Trigonometry

Targeting students in Mathematics, Engineering, and Physical Sciences, this course provides the foundation necessary for a rigorous study of calculus. It covers non-linear inequalities, functions, and graphs. The primary focus is on polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Applications are also discussed extensively. Additional topics may include analytic geometry with an emphasis on the conic sections, Gibbs notation vector algebra, polar coordinates, sequences, series, and mathematical induction. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT175

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
MAT220
Discrete Mathematics and Introduction to Proofs

This introductory course is designed for prospective mathematics and computer science majors. It covers basic techniques of mathematical proof and reasoning, with an emphasis on discrete structures as well as concepts widely used in computing. Topics include set theory, functions, relations, proposition logic, methods of proof, mathematical induction, recursion, and Boolean algebra. Additional topics in discrete mathematics will be selected from number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and finite state automata.

Prerequisites: MAT180 or MAT195 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

4
MAT240
Calculus I

This calculus course is designed for engineering, natural sciences, computer science, and mathematics majors. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, the fundamental theorem, applications on curve sketching, optimization, areas and volumes, differentiation and integration (up to substitution) involving trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions.

Prerequisites: MAT0190 or MAT195 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
MAT245
Linear Algebra

Study of abstract mathematical systems. Topics include matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, and characteristic values.

Prerequisite: MAT240

Offered: Varies

4
MAT250
Calculus II

Continuation of MAT240 Calculus I. Topics include calculus of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; techniques of integration, moments and centroids; indeterminate forms and improper integrals; Taylor's formula; and infinite series.

Prerequisite: MAT240 or MAT185

Offered: Varies

4
MAT260
Calculus III

The sequel to MAT250. Topics include parametric equations and polar coordinates, vector-valved functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and topics from vector calculus and from differential equations.

Prerequisite: MAT250

Offered: Varies

4
MAT270
Differential Equations

This first course in differential equations is designed for students with interests in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering. Coverage and emphasis is given to methods of solution, precise statement of theorems and definitions, problem applications.

Prerequisite: MAT250

Offered: Varies

3
Medical Interpreter Credits
MIN101
Medical Interpreter I

This introductory course, designed for individuals who are bilingual in English and Spanish or English and Portuguese, focuses on the basic competency skills necessary to work as a trained medical interpreter. The course adheres to the Standards of Practice for medical interpreters as established by the National Council on Interpreting in Healthcare. Students may repeat this course to be qualified in another language if desired.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score or ESL201 and target language assessment conducted in the first class session

Offered: Varies

3
MIN102
Medical Interpreter II

This course is designed for individuals who are bilingual in English and Spanish or English and Portuguese continuing the study of medical interpreter practice and for experienced medical interpreters. The focus is on necessary advanced competency skills, written translation, and vocabulary. Students may repeat this course to be qualified in another language if desired.

Prerequisite: BIT103 and MIN101 with a grade of C or higher

Offered: Varies

3
MIN200
Medical Interpreter Practicum

This course, designed for individuals who are bilingual in English and Spanish or English and Portuguese, will focus on skills acquired during coursework in Medical Interpreter I and Medical Interpreter II. The course adheres to the Standards of Practice for medical interpreters as established by the National Council on Interpreting in Healthcare. Students will complete 150 hours of supervised medical interpreter activity in a community healthcare organization*. Students may repeat this course to be qualified in another language if desired.

*Please see the CORI/SORI policy

Prerequisite: MIN102; Co-requisite: BIO105

Offered: Varies

3
Music Credits
MUS100
Music Appreciation

A survey of development of music from the Renaissance to the present including jazz and the contemporary scene. Emphasis on basic musical materials and principles of design. For students not planning to major in music; no previous musical training required.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS101
Music Theory I

This course examines the fundamental materials including pitch, rhythm, tonal systems, ear training, and basic harmony for those wishing to learn or to improve music reading skills. Students practice in performance and composition for instruments and voice.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS102
Music History I

This course is a detailed study of styles and forms of music from ancient cultures to eighteenth-century classicism. Major compositions, personalities, styles, and forms are explored through structured listening, analysis, and reading assignments.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS103
Music History II

This course is a detailed study of styles and forms of music from the eighteenth-century to the present. Major compositions, personalities, styles, and forms are explored through structured listening, analysis, and reading assignments.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS104
Fundamentals of Music

This course introduces the fundamental materials of music, including pitch, rhythm, scales, ear training, and basic melodic notation. Elementary principles of vocal tone production are explored, and basic keyboard technique is introduced.

Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite: None

3
MUS113
Select Chorus

An opportunity for experienced vocalists to rehearse and perform challenging music for a variety of modern musical styles. All participants are expected to be able to read music at a moderate degree of proficiency and produce a controlled vocal quality. (2 hours/week plus 2 dress rehearsals and a final performance)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

1
MUS116
History of Rock Music

This course explores the origins, characteristics and stylistic development of rock music. The emphasis is on the artists, songwriters, and producers who have created the most famous hits and long term trends.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS120
Applied Music

Students receive private instruction in vocal or instrumental music, appropriate to the level of the student. (15 one-half hour tutorial lessons) There is an Applied Music charge.

Prerequisite: Assessment audition

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

1
MUS121
Advanced Applied Music

This course provides private instruction in vocal or instrumental music appropriate to the level of the student. (15 one-hour tutorial lessons) There is an Applied Music charge.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

2
MUS122G
Beginning Guitar

Students study, rehearse, and perform music in a small group setting. Emphasis is placed on learning to read standard musical notation, with attention also given to chords. Performances on campus and in the immediate community are part of class activities. Students are expected to provide their own guitar.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
MUS122P
Beginning Piano

Students study, rehearse and perform keyboard music in a class setting. Emphasis is placed on learning to read standard musical notation in bass and treble clefs. Performances on campus and in the immediate community are part of class activities. Students are expected to provide their own portable keyboard. (3 hours per week for 7 weeks)

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
MUS123
Jazz Combo

Students rehearse and perform jazz in a variety of styles which may include: blues, Dixieland, swing, bebop, Latin, and rock. Performances on campus and in the immediate community are part of Jazz Combo activities. Students are expected to be able to read standard music notation. (Three class hours per week plus one dress rehearsal and one performance near the end of the semester.)

Prerequisite: MUS101 or ability to read from standard musical notation

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

1
MUS124G
Guitar II

This continuation of Beginning Guitar course involves study, rehearsal, and performance of music in a class of up to 12 guitars. Emphasis is placed on expanding the students' abilities to read and perform from standard musical notation in treble clef and chord symbols. Repertoire varies from one semester to the next. Performances on campus and in the immediate community are part of class activities. Students are expected to provide their own instrument.

Prerequisite: MUS122-G or permission of the instructor

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

1
MUS124P
Piano II

This is a continuation of MUS122P Beginning Piano. Students study, rehearse and perform keyboard music in a class setting. The emphasis is placed on expanding the students’ ability to read and perform from standard musical notation in treble and bass clefs. Performances on campus and in the immediate community are part of class activities. Students are expected to provide their own portable keyboard.

Prerequisite: MUS122P

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated; 6 credit maximum.

1
MUS202
Music Theory II

This course is a continuation of MUS101 with emphasis on harmony and form.

Prerequisite: MUS101

Semester Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS205
Song Writing

Students learn how to compose songs and discover the relationships among melody, harmony, rhythm, and lyrics (when present). Through analysis, students explore why hit songs are successful. Attention is also paid to creating stylistically appropriate introductions and endings, interludes, popular "hooks," and complete arrangements.

Prerequisite: MUS101

Offered: Spring

3
Nursing Credits
CNA113
Advanced Rehabilitation Nursing Assistant

This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of Rehabilitation and Restorative Care Concepts for the Nursing Assistant working in a variety of settings with people of all ages.

Prerequisite: Documentation of at least a 75-hour nursing assistant and/or home health aide course

Offered: Varies

1
CNA114
Effective Strategies for Working with Alzheimer's Patients

This course is designed to offer caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease a variety of strategies to use in meeting the person's needs and understanding and dealing with often difficult behaviors.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

1
CNA117
Tri-Level Nursing Assistant/Home Health Aide

This 140-hour course, 75 classroom and lab and 65 hours of supervised clinical practice, teaches basic nursing skills and beginning interpersonal relationship techniques to entry-level students in the classroom and clinical area. The curriculum is divided into three levels of care: long-term, home health, and acute. It is possible to exit with certification upon completion of any one of the levels. Applicants must attend an information session and interview prior to admission.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

6
CNA122
Advanced Concepts for Nursing Assistants

This course is designed to teach advanced skills to nursing assistants and home health aides working with more acutely ill patients in Medicare (sub-acute) units in nursing homes, in home care, and in hospitals.

Prerequisite: CNA117 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Varies

1
CNA128
Pediatrics and Parenting

This course is designed to prepare nursing assistants/home health aides to care for children in community settings. Topics include health promotion, parenting, hospice care, and care of the sick and disabled child and adolescent. A holistic approach to families is used to assist in meeting the physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual needs of children and their careproviders.

Prerequisite: CNA117 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Varies

3
CNA138
Rehabilitation/Restorative Aide

This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of the nursing assistant/home health aide in the field of rehabilitation/restoration through a combination of classroom and laboratory practice. Students acquire the skills to assist in the day to day rehabilitation plan of care established by, and under the supervision of the physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist and /or the registered nurse in a variety of settings.

Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED and documented completion of at least a 75-hour nursing assistant or home health aide course

Offered: Varies

3
NUR100
Pharmacology Calculations

This course examines the methods of dosage calculation required for safe administration of medications to children and adults. Interpretation of medical orders and systems of measurements are included. Introduces dimensional analysis to convert and calculate dosages of oral, parenteral, and intravenous medications.

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

1
NUR107
Fundamentals Of Nursing

Introduction to concepts of health, the individual, and nursing. Principles of the natural, behavioral, and social sciences are applied to nursing. Nursing process is used to meet the basic human needs of the young, middle, and older adult in health and illness. Health assessment, interpersonal and psychomotor nursing skills are addressed in the classroom and practiced in the campus laboratory and community health agencies with faculty guidance. (4 class hours/12 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: Admission to the College and Nursing program. Current American Heart Association or American Red Cross certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR/Basic Life Support – 8 hour course). ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score; and BIO107 and NUR100. BIT103 is strongly recommended. Co-requisite: BIO108, ENL101, and PSY101

Offered: Fall

8
NUR108
Nursing Across The Lifespan

Basic concepts of human development, human behavior and scientific principles are applied to the care of the childbearing family, children and adults with health problems. The cycle from infancy to the older adult is integrated with emphasis on developmental stressors and the role of family and community. This course builds upon and expands basic concepts of health assessment, interpersonal and psychomotor nursing skills. Nursing process is applied to the childbearing family, the child from infancy to adolescence and the young, middle and older adult. Nursing care of patients with selected health problems related to nutrition/fluid balance and activity/exercise is integrated. Nursing care of the preoperative patient is included. Correlated clinical laboratory experiences with faculty guidance are required. (4 class hours/12 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: NUR107, BIO108, ENL101, and PSY101. Co-requisite: PSY233

Offered: Spring

8
NUR132
LPN In Transition

This course prepares the student for advanced placement in NUR201 of the Nursing program by introducing concepts of professional nursing practice and building upon basic concepts of human development/behavior and scientific principles applied to the care of the childbearing family/children/adults with common health problems. The cycle from infancy to older adulthood is integrated including emphasis on developmental stressors, the family, and community. Correlated campus lab experiences with faculty guidance are required. (10 class hours/12 clinical hours)

Prerequisite: Current licensure as a Licensed Practical Nurse; current CPR certification; satisfactory basic skills assessment scores; ENL101, PSY101, PSY233, BIO107, BIO108, NUR100, and COM103 or ENL102; admission to the College and to the Nursing program

Offered: Summer

8
NUR201
Physical And Mental Health I

This course focuses on the patient/client across the life span with acute major health problems. The curriculum builds upon knowledge of scientific principles and utilization of critical thinking. Nursing process, interpersonal communication, stress adaptation, cultural competence and environmental influences are integrated. The structured acute care setting and the on-campus nursing laboratory are primarily utilized for application of nursing knowledge and development of clinical skills. Campus laboratory experiences are assigned in addition to class and clinical schedule. (6 class hours/12 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: NUR108 or NUR132 and current CPR certification. Corequisite: BIO201 and HEA200

Offered: Fall

10
NUR202
Physical And Mental Health II

This course is the continued study of patient/client needs within an integrated framework. Focus is on the patient/client across the life span with chronic health problems. Emphasis is on the areas of rehabilitation, gerontology, mental health and community. Psychiatric, rehabilitation, medical-surgical and community-based agencies are utilized for application of nursing knowledge and clinical skills. Campus laboratory experiences are assigned in addition to class and clinical schedule. (4 class hours/12 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: NUR201, BIO201, and HEA200

Offered: Spring

8
NUR203
Foundations Of The Profession

This course analyzes the practice of nursing in contemporary society. Historical perspectives and current issues and trends are studied. Accountability, legal responsibilities of licensure, the ethical issues arising in the present health care systems, and leadership and management in nursing are major units of study. Political, economic, social, and cultural influences in nursing practice are considered.

Prerequisite: NUR201

Offered: Spring

3
Paralegal Credits
LGS130
Introduction to Substantive Law

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of law and the judicial system. Students obtain an overview of criminal law, torts, property, contracts, wills, trusts, and employment law. Particular attention is given to general skills required of paralegals.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
LGS131
Family Law

The law of marriage, divorce, annulment, legal separation, pre-marital agreements, cohabitation, child support, alimony, and adoption are studied, as well as their implementing procedures.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Fall (even years)

3
LGS132
Law Office Management

Students learn to work in a law office environment and receive hands-on training in billing, basic bookkeeping, form preparation and library maintenance. Legal ethics, attorney/client relationships, and the paralegal's role in maintaining files, libraries and client confidentiality are stressed.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Spring

1
LGS133
Legal Research and Writing

This course is an introduction to the methods and materials employed in legal research and the writing of legal memoranda and briefs. Emphasis is placed on how and where to locate the law and how to present the law that is found in those sources. Many different strategies of research are explored including computer resources and online database research.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130 and ENL101 and two of the following: (LGS131/BIT131, LGS134/BIT134, LGS135/BIT135, LGS136/BIT136, LGS137BIT137)

Offered: Spring

3
LGS134
Real Estate, Mortgages and Landlord-Tenant Law

This course is a study of the law of real property with special emphasis on both substantive law and practical considerations including drafting of real estate contracts and documents, title examinations, and an understanding of the mortgage lending field. Particular attention is given to the skills needed by paralegals including closing documents.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Spring (odd years)

3
LGS135
Civil Litigation

This course covers basic steps in lawsuits from the initial interview through the appellate process. Students learn how to prepare complaints, answers, motions, discovery and study in-depth the different phases of a civil trial.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Fall

3
LGS136
Estate Planning, Wills, Trusts and Probate Procedures

This course covers the procedure, techniques and the substantive law in the planning of estates from simple wills to more complicated trusts. Students also learn to administer the estate of the deceased and will study the tax consequences involved.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Spring (even years)

3
LGS137
Contracts, Business Organizations and Transactions

Students are introduced to the Law of Contracts with an emphasis on understanding the interrelationships among concepts and the tools required in drafting good solid contracts. Students learn how to choose and organize the different types of business organizations such as sole proprietorships, partnership, limited liability entities, and corporations.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Fall (odd years)

3
LGS138
Criminal Law and Procedure

This course is a study of criminal law and procedure with special emphasis on both substantive and procedural criminal law and constitutional issues. Students learn to draft motions, and other documents necessary for criminal defense and prosecution, prepare affidavits, briefs, and discovery. Particular attention is given to the skills needed by paralegals to assist attorneys and other legal professionals.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130

Offered: Fall

3
LGS238
Internships Paralegal Studies

Students spend the semester (180 hours, at least 12 hours per week) working in a paralegal setting, either in a private law firm or for a government or non-profit agency such as the Sheriff's department, District Attorney's office, court, or Legal Aid office. Participation in this course is subject to availability of placements, application and acceptance into the course.

Prerequisite: LGS130/BIT130, LGS133/BIT133, LGS135/BIT135 and (LGS131/BIT131 or LGS134/BIT134 or LGS136/BIT136 or LGS137/BIT137) The fourth prerequisite must reflect the type of legal practice in which the student interns. A 3.0 grade point average is required.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Philosophy Credits
PHI130
Introduction To Philosophy

This course provides the student with an introduction to six major issues in philosophy. Although the course is essentially an "isms" course, there is substantial and focused emphasis on historical development. In every section of the course, original source materials are read and used.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PHI131
Logic

This course is an introduction to the principles of logic. It is designed for students who wish to develop their habits of thinking clearly and logically in the everyday world as well as in specialized areas such as science and technology. Although there will be some coverage of informal logic, the thrust of the course will be on formal logic including the following topics: deduction and syllogistic logic, symbolic logic, and induction and scientific method.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI160
Three Great Thinkers

Students in this course will engage in a critical examination of a number of contemporary seminal ideas central to the human experience of both Eastern and Western thinkers. Students will study the writings of three major thinkers in the history of ideas. The three will be announced before pre-registration each semester and will vary from semester to semester, so the course will never be the same. Students will explore the ideas in the course for internal consistency and for the historical contexts in which they arose, as well as the actual consequences those ideas have had in human affairs.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a previous philosophy course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

Note: May be repeated once.

3
PHI201
Existentialism

This course provides the student with a comprehensive analysis of the multifaceted view toward life which has come to be known as existentialism. Social, moral, legal, religious, literary, as well as epistemological and metaphysical aspects of the existentialistic point of view, are considered.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI210
Ethics

This course provides a rigorous and thorough examination of the major ethical theories in the history of Western philosophy, covering the work of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Hobbes, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Mill, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Ayer, and contemporary writers such as Callahan, Raz, Rawls, Nozick, and Frankl. The early part of the course is a study of metaethics and of the terminology used in doing ethical analysis. The body of the course involves the study of five major theories of normative ethics: natural law theories, social contract theories, duty-based (deontological) theories, utilitarian (teleological) theories, and existentialist theories. Skeptical alternatives to these theories will also be considered. In the last month of the semester, each student is expected to focus on a project dealing with a specific ethical theory or problem area.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI241
Selected Topics in Philosophy

This course will serve as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in Philosophy introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory level Philosophy course

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
Physics Credits
PHY106
Survey Of Physics

Classical and modern physics presented conceptually and experimentally for students desiring a one-semester introduction to physics. The class emphasizes verbal and conceptual understanding of the way the world works using as little mathematics as possible. This course is appropriate for non-science majors and as a preparation for PHY211. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT030 or MAT035, ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY151
Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for any student interested in science and particularly appropriate for health sciences and pre-professional students. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: MAT040 or MAT110 or MAT035, and ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY152
Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; light and optics, and some modern physics. The course is appropriate for non-science majors who are interested in science. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY101 pr PHY151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY211
University Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used. Previous experience in physics (such as PHY106) is strongly recommended. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT240, Calculus I. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: MAT195; Co-requisite: ENL101 and MAT240

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY212
University Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics using calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; optics; and a brief introduction to modern physics. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used throughout the course. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT250, Calculus II. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY211

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
SCI261
Cooperative Work Experience in the Natural Sciences

This course provides students the opportunity to participate in a laboratory or field project in the natural sciences, under the supervision of a mentor. The course provides the student with the opportunity to apply the principles learned in the classroom to a practical real-world project. The project may be performed on campus, or at an off-campus location. The project outline needs to be approved by the department. Time commitment is based on the number of credits, approximately 70 hours per credit.

Prerequisite: Two 4-credit science with labs courses with a grade of C or higher and approval of the department

Offered: Varies

1–4
Political Science Credits
GOV101
Comparative Politics

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic concepts and themes in comparative politics. Using a case studies approach, the course compares and contrasts states according to political ideology, process, socialization, historical evolution, public policy, state institutions, and governmental systems.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
GOV102
International Relations

This course features an historical examination of the fundamentals of international relations in theory and practice. Topics pertaining to developed and developing nations, security, power, science and technology, and international organizations are discussed with emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
GOV110
The American Presidency

This course explores the responsibilities, staff, functions, and limitations of the modern American presidency. While the course covers the origins of the presidency, the reading and lecture material focuses on the modern American presidency in the post-1932 period. This course explores the cultural, social, and economic changes that have wrought political changes in the meaning and role of the presidency.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
GOV111
American Government

This course provides an introductory examination of the federal government. Emphasis is placed upon the political system in both principle and practice, the structure of our government, and public safety.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
GOV241
Selected Topics in Government

This course serves as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in Government introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory level Government course

Offered: Varies

Note: May be repeated once for credit

3
Portuguese Credits
PRT100
Conversational Brazilian Portuguese

This basic conversational Brazilian Portuguese course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of Portuguese to the four basic skills necessary to develop a working knowledge of Portuguese: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
PRT125
Conversational Brazilian Portuguese II

This basic conversational Brazilian Portuguese II course is designed to provide continued practice and mastery for the non-native speaker of Portuguese in the four basic skills necessary to develop a working knowledge of Portuguese: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing.

Prerequisite: PRT100

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
Psychology Credits
PSY100
Psychology of Career Development

This course introduces students to the lifelong career development process. Career development theories are explored. Students gain self-knowledge through assessment of interests, abilities, values and personality. Influences on career aspirations are explored. Interpretations of success are examined. Students identify and investigate potential career options. Information is analyzed and decision making skills are employed to develop career goals and action plans. Students are introduced to the benefits of networks, mentors, and role models. Students develop job search materials including a resume and cover letter. Students gain familiarity with the process and skills for employment interviewing.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

1
PSY101
General Psychology

Introduction to the major concepts and principles underlying human behavior and mental processes. Topics include personality theory, development, learning and thought, brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, stress and physical health, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and social psychology.

Prerequisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY201
Child Psychology

This course focuses on important aspects of physical, cognitive, social and emotional development, occurring from the prenatal period through middle childhood. The major theories of development, research methods and the important roles of genetics and neuroscience are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of early experiences and biological factors in the later formation of personality, intellectual, and emotional behaviors.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY202
Adolescent Psychology

Physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development of the human being during adolescence. Suggested for students planning to major in psychology, education, social work, or related areas.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY205
Adult Psychology

This course will focus on the normative physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes throughout the adult years with consideration of the sociocultural contexts that shape what it means to be an adult. Particular attention will be given to the influences of gender, class, race, sexual orientation, and changing trends.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral & Social Science general education requirement.

3
PSY207
Abnormal Psychology

This course includes the study of the major psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. Analysis is made of the probable causes of these disorders with emphasis on the strengths and limitations of the commonly used therapies. Consideration is given to positive, constructive, alternative responses to the basic problems of living.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY208
Principles of Counseling & Crisis Intervention

Analysis of a variety of life crises, methods of effecting intervention, and procedures for establishing a counseling relationship when appropriate. Designed to introduce those now in, or preparing for, the helping professions or related paraprofessional positions, to the principles of effective crisis intervention and counseling.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY209
Group Dynamics in Human Services

This course explores the various stages of therapeutic groups, including group development. Emphasis is on basic group theory, process, and effective practice skills. Students are acquainted with task-oriented and treatment-oriented groups in a broad range of settings. This course may incorporate experiential learning where students learn about group processes via group exercises in class. Service Learning may be required.

Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring.

3
PSY212
Human Sexuality

This course explores the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Sexuality is considered a vital part of the total human organism. Issues of psycho-sexual development, sexual physiology, sexual attitudes, gender identity, love and sex, sex and the law, sexual lifestyles, and sexual dysfunction, among others, are discussed in an open, frank manner. Audio/visual material, internet websites, and discussion forums augment the textbook and lecture content.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY214
Research Methods in Psychology

In this course, students will learn how to develop research questions, review existing literature (online databases and physical locations), design studies (both qualitative and quantitative), select samples from populations, formulate a hypothesis, operationalize variables, ensure the validity and reliability of an experiment, analyze and interpret data, summarize findings using the APA format, explore and critique research in peer-reviewed journals and in popular media, understand the importance of ethics in research and how scientific findings influence public policy.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score.

Offered: Varies.

3
PSY216
Social Science Research Methods

This course introduces the basic research techniques and skills of the social sciences through an interdisciplinary, topical approach. Qualitative and quantitative research methods including ethnography, observation, survey and experimentation are discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Topics include formulating social science hypotheses, identifying variables, constructing and interpreting questionnaires, interviewing, and observing participants. Other topics include social scientists' use of statistics; research ethics; interpretation and communication of research findings, and the relevance of research to public policies in our society. Students may not earn credit for SOC225.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and (MAT020 or MAT025)

Offered: Varies

3
PSY219
Psychology Of Women

This course is designed for both females and males wishing a broader understanding of the physiological, psychological, and sociological determinants of female growth and development. It concentrates on developmental issues and contemporary role expectations, conflicts, and the status of women within a culturally defined role throughout the life cycle.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY225
Social Psychology

In an ever-changing global society, the individual is both influenced by the groups they encounter and conversely they influence those same groups. Social Psychology addresses human interaction and its consequences. Topics include conformity, aggression, motivation, group organization, social influences on perception, cognitive processes, and culture's impact on social behavior, addressing issues of tolerance within an increasingly diverse society. Emphasis is on the application of concepts.

Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY231
Psychology Of Aging

This course presents a developmental perspective on the older adult. Biological, social and psychological changes in personality and behaviors will be studied with special attention to old age.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Varies

3
PSY233
Developmental Psychology: The Life Span

This course provides a survey of the physical, cognitive, sexual, social and moral issues relevant to human development across the life span.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY234
Brain and Behavior

Brain and Behavior is all about the central nervous system (CNS) – its evolution, structures, development, and basic operating principles. Over the course of the semester students study the neural underpinnings (brain bases) of ordinary behaviors such as talking, moving, thinking, and dreaming. They also explore instances when the CNS "goes awry"; that is, examine the causes and behavioral effects of CNS disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Spring

3
PSY235
Cognitive Psychology

This course defines and explains the major concepts and principles underlying Cognitive Psychology. Topics include the human information processing system, perception and attention, short-term memory, different aspects of long term memory, judgements, reasoning and problem solving.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

 

3
PSY241
Selected Topics in Psychology

In this course, students will learn how to develop research questions, review existing literature (online databases and physical locations), design studies (both qualitative and quantitative), select samples from populations, formulate a hypothesis, operationalize variables, ensure the validity and reliability of an experiment, analyze and interpret data, summarize findings using the APA format, explore and critique research in peer-reviewed journals and in popular media, understand the importance of ethics in research and how scientific findings influence public policy.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

3
Religion Credits
REL122
Concepts Of Western Religion

A study of the major concepts and beliefs, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from historical, philosophical, and cultural perspectives with consideration of the influence on personal and contemporary life.

Prerequisite None

Offered: Spring

3
REL123
Concepts Of Eastern Religion

A study of the major concepts and beliefs including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism from historical, philosophical and cultural perspective with consideration of the influence on personal and contemporary life.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Summer

3
Service Learning Credits
SLR101
Service Learning Option

This course is a fourth-credit option which may be added as an additional "lab" to an existing course. Students conduct a minimum of 50 hours of community service. Students interested in this course must first enroll in and have the permission of the instructor of an anchor three or four credit course. This additional course requires a contract between the student and faculty member. All contracts are submitted to the College Service Learning coordinator for approval.

Co-requisite: Enrollment in a college-level credit course and permission of both instructor and Service Learning coordinator

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

1
Sociology Credits
SOC106
Principles of Sociology

An introduction to basic social concepts, theoretical perspectives and research methods. Topics include societies, cultures, social organization, social inequalities, social institutions, group behavior and the impact of globalization, population growth, and new technologies upon individuals and societies.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: ENL108 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC205
Juvenile Delinquency

This course analyzes delinquent behavior of young people in our society, using various studies of the topic. It emphasizes the relationship between delinquent behavior and today's social and political conditions.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC209
Sociology of Race & Ethnicity

This course focuses on the study of racial and ethnic relationships; analyzes the structures and circumstances which promote political, economic, and cultural domination; the role of racist ideology; the pervasive nature of prejudice and discrimination; survival and resistance strategies of the dominated.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC210
Marriage & Family: Sociology of Family Interaction and Organization

Study of the social aspects of family life and the impact of society upon families. Topics include historical forms of family life, varieties of contemporary families, the effects of changing cultural values and economic forces upon the daily life and stability of families, gender, the social psychology of love and romance, sex, parenting, and divorce. The course also covers family policy issues.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC211
Domestic Violence and Victimology

The major focus of this sociology course introduces students to research on domestic violence and victimology. Theories of domestic violence (the resource theory, symbolic interaction theory, functionalism, conflict theory, and criminological theories) are introduced, defined, and applied throughout the class. The macro-sociological view looks at violence as a societal-level. The micro-sociological view looks at the social interaction between perpetrators and victims. Data, research, and case studies are explored.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Fall

3
SOC215
Social Problems

A survey of the nature and range of social problems, the global and societal conditions which give rise to them, and the methods by which societies attempt to cope with them.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC220
Sociology Of Health And Health Care

This course examines the socio-cultural aspects of health, illness and health care. Topics include development of scientific medicine, social epidemiology; definition of health and illness; social and cultural dimensions of disease and the illness experience; ethical issues in health care and health care reform. Effects of social stratification on access to health care, health professionals; the politics and economics of health care for selected diseases, such as breast cancer and HIV, are explored.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or PSY101 or BIO101 or BIO105

Offered: Varies

3
SOC225
Social Science Research

This course introduces the basic research techniques and skills of the social sciences through an interdisciplinary, topical approach. Qualitative and quantitative research methods including ethnography, observation, survey and experimentation are discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Topics include formulating social science hypotheses, identifying variables, constructing and interpreting questionnaires, interviewing, and observing participants. Other topics include social scientists' use of statistics; research ethics; interpretation and communication of research findings, and the relevance of research to public policies in our society. Students may not earn credit for PSY216.

Prerequisite: SOC106 and (MAT020 or MAT025)

Offered: Varies

3
SOC230
Peoples and Cultures of Africa

The course examines Africa’s social, economic, political, religious and cultural institutions, as well as the origins, cultural practices, population dynamics, family structures, marriage, inheritances, values, ethnicity, gender relations and patriarchy, and inter-tribal and ethnic conflicts in modern Africa. Contemporary issues such as HIV/AIDS epidemic, poverty, and Africa’s place in the global world are examined.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or ANT107 or HIS119 or HIS120

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral & Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC235
The Sociology of Gender: Roles of Men and Women in Global Perspective

Study of the changing social roles and experiences of men and women throughout the world. Family, educational, economic, political, community and cultural aspects of men and women's lives will be explored.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or PSY101

Offered: Fall

3
SOC241
Selected Topics in Sociology

This course will serve as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in Sociology introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory level Sociology or Anthropology course

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
Spanish Credits
SPN100
Conversational Spanish

This basic conversational Spanish course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of Spanish to the four basic skills necessary to developing a working knowledge of Spanish: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on speaking and understanding spoken Spanish.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
SPN101
Elementary Spanish I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary Spanish sequence for beginning non-native students of Spanish. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken Spanish. This course is not intended for students whose native language is Spanish.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN102
Elementary Spanish II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college Elementary Spanish sequence. It is for beginning students of Spanish. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken Spanish. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: SPN101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN105
Elementary Spanish I for Health Professionals

This is a one semester college Elementary Spanish course with focused instruction in Spanish language, culture, and health issues of relevance to health professionals working with Spanish speaking populations. The text and ancillary materials provide development of the four skills: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding Spanish.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory basic skills assessment score or co-requisite ENL108

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN123
Immersion Study in Spanish Language/Civilization

Students study Spanish language and civilization in a Spanish speaking country. Traditional class work is supplemented by cultural activities and fieldtrips.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

3
SPN126
Travel and Study in a Spanish Country

This is an educational field trip for Spanish language students enrolled at Cape Cod Community College. Visits could include Spain, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, or any other Spanish speaking country.

Corequisite: Any credit Spanish class at Cape Cod Community College.

Offered: Spring

Note: One week to 10 days.

Note: May be repeated to a maximum of 4 credits.

1
SPN128
Onsite Spanish Culture

>A ten-day study tour in a Spanish speaking country. Visits could include Spain, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Cuba, etc.

Prerequisite: One semester of college Spanish with a grade of C or better

Offered: Varies

3
SPN201
Intermediate Spanish I

This course is for students who have completed one year of elementary college Spanish or three to four years of high school Spanish. Students read, discuss, and write about Hispanic culture and language in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPN102 or 3–4 years of high school Spanish

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN202
Intermediate Spanish II

This is the second semester of the sequential intermediate college-level Spanish emphasizing further mastery of speaking, understanding, reading and writing Spanish. Readings include historical and literary aspects of the Hispanic world and Spain. This course completes Stage III of the Language Learning Continuum of the ACTFL (American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages). (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: SPN201 or 5 years of high school Spanish

Offered: Spring

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN301
Advanced Spanish I

This course is a survey of selected Spanish literary works. These selections serve as a basis for classroom discussion and writing assignments. Conversation and composition polish and develop students' abilities in all four language skills.

Prerequisite: SPN202

Offered: Fall

3
SPN302
Advanced Spanish II

This course is a survey of selected Spanish literary works. These selections serve as a basis for classroom discussion and writing assignments. Conversation and composition polish and develop students' abilities in all four language skills.

Prerequisite: SPN301

Offered: Spring

3
Theater and Dance Credits
DAN102
Musical Theater Dance

This course is designed to develop students’ classic musical theatre dance skills. The class covers the basic steps, vocabulary, and variations of jazz, tap and contemporary choreography as they relate to musical theatre. The course explores the influence of award winning choreographers such as Bob Fosse, Jerome Robbins, Gower Champion and/or Susan Stroman. Students will cultivate acting skills and character development as channeled through dance, and although singing is not taught, the instructor will emphasize the importance of vocal training to complement musical theatre dance training.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score; THR103 recommended.

Offered: Varies

3
DAN120
Modern Dance I

This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of modern dance techniques and composition. Participation in dance exercises, observation, and discussion of various modern dance styles enables students to develop a physical awareness and understanding of modern dance. Emphasis is placed on participation.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
DAN126
African Dance & Drumming

This course serves as an introduction to the study of African dance and drumming including techniques, history and composition of dance as well as drumming techniques and rhythmic styles. In class, all students participate in both dance and drumming. Students learn about Africa including Mali, Senegal, Guinea, and West Africa and how these cultures have influenced art forms throughout the world. (Students may earn credit for either DAN126 or MUS125.)

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
DAN127
Middle Eastern Dance & Culture

This course serves as an introduction to the study of North African (Egypt and the Maghreb) and Middle Eastern dance and culture including history, composition, rhythms, finger cymbals, and styles of folkloric dance, drumming and costume. Students learn about the culture and world influence of the arts of the Middle East and North Africa.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: May be repeated once for credit.

3
DAN221
Modern Dance Techniques II

This course provides students with the opportunity to continue the study of Modern Dance technique and composition. Students participate in intermediate dance exercises and execute more advanced technique. Students observe and discuss dance styles which include interdisciplinary collaboration with music, art, and theater, and develop a further understanding and appreciation of modern dance performance.

Prerequisite: DAN120

Offered: Spring

3
THR101
Introduction To Theater

This course explores the many facets that make up the experience of theater. Students probe questions like: what is the essence of theater, who are the artists that create what one sees on stage, what are the types of drama, the trends, and movements since the Ancient Greeks, and how are plays reflective of playwrights' cultures? Students broaden their knowledge and experience of what constitutes the art of theater through reading, class discussion, lecture, staged readings, and viewing live and video performances.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
THR102
Page To Stage: Planning Play Productions

Students consider the life cycle of a play from the page to the stage. Students read several plays, each to be explored from the viewpoint of the director, the various designers, and other collaborating artists.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

3
THR103
Acting I

Students explore basic acting concepts, characterization, script analysis, and improvisation to develop confidence and skill when performing before an audience. Through observation, practice and analysis a variety of tools and techniques for effective performance will be applied to acting exercises, scenes and monologues.

Prerequisite: ENL025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
THR104
Introduction to Stage Management

This course provides an introduction to the role of the stage manager throughout the lifecycle of a theatrical production including preproduction, rehearsal period, technical preparation, technical rehearsals, opening, running of the show, production wrap up and post-production. Through written exercises and the construction of a complete prompt-book using word processing and spreadsheet software, students gain an appreciation of the role of the stage manager as the facilitator, mediator and organizer of the production process.

Prerequisite: THR101 or equivalent

Semester Offered: Spring

1
THR105
Introduction to Theatrical Makeup

Students in this course will explore the practice of stage makeup with emphasis on the requirements of dramatic character. Students learn how to research and practice the application of stage make-up and basic special effects. The course provides hands-on experience in makeup design and application for the performing arts. Students may be given the option to design make up plots for department productions as appropriate.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

1
THR113
Rehearsal and Performance

Rehearsal and Performance is a practicum where students participate in the multifaceted experience from interpreting a play to participating in a live theatre production. Students accept responsibilities as performers and/or production crew members in a college theatrical production.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

Note: General Education application pending.

Note: May be repeated for credit; 6 credit maximum.

1
THR117
Introduction To Theater Design

Students use a practical, hands-on approach to designing and constructing various scenic elements for the stage including sets, costumes, props, and lighting. (2 class hours/3 studio hours)

Prerequisite: None; THR120 recommended

Offered: Spring (alt)

3
THR120
Stagecraft and Theater Technologies

Students explore various aspects of technical theater production through research, observation and practice. Students develop skills in the design, planning, engineering, construction, and manipulation of a variety of theatrical technologies, including scenery, color mixing and paint application techniques, hanging, installation and focusing of theatrical lighting instruments, and operation of industry standard lighting, sound and video projection mapping systems for production purposes. Students gain practical experience by supporting the department’s theatrical productions.

Prerequisites: ENL025 and MAT025 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: May be repeated once for credit; 6 credit maximum.

3
THR125
Stage Movement

This course is designed to introduce the non-dancer to the fundamentals of movement and expression through observation, analysis, interpretation, and demonstration. Students learn postural alignment, centering, breathing techniques an kinesthetic (body) awareness. individual and group exercises are used to explore various practices such as mime, mask, stage combat, and more.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

3
THR203
Acting II

This course builds on skills developed in a beginning acting class to include more advanced work in character development. Students are introduced to advanced level work on text analysis, character motivation and physical acting.

Prerequisite: THR103

Offered: Spring

3
THR205
Directing For Theater

This studio course combines the introduction of basic directing theory and the application of technique to assigned scenes. Students are expected to have some previous theater experience on stage or behind the scenes. Students learn to interpret scripts for performance, prepare for auditions, manage rehearsals, and refine actors work for public presentation.

Prerequisite: THR103

Offered: Varies

3
THR209
Audition and Portfolio Preparation

This is a course linking the work of the performance classroom with the professional performing arts scene. Students develop audition pieces and learn auditioning techniques. Cold reading technique, monologue preparation as well as the actor's interview also are covered. Students develop resumes and choose a headshot. They attend regional auditions and engage in the process of finding work in the performing arts beyond the college setting.

Prerequisite: THR203 or demonstrate equivalent knowledge.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
THR261
Theater Cooperative Work Experience

This course is designed to expand student knowledge through actual work involvement in the field of theatre arts. Working with a faculty mentor and collaborating with an employer, the student will demonstrate mastery of the student learning outcomes of pre-requisite courses. A minimum of 150 hours of onsite work is required. The student will meet with the instructor an average of one hour a week.

Prerequisite: THR101 and THR113 or THR119 and approval of faculty mentor

Offered: Varies

3