Behavioral & Social Sciences Credits
ANT107
Introduction to Anthropology

This is an introduction to the principles and procedures of anthropology. The course is divided into two main areas: Physical Anthropology, which covers the physical nature of humans and the evolution of this nature; and Cultural Anthropology, which covers the cultural nature of humans including the origin and development of social institutions.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ANT211
Comparative Cultures

This course provides an in-depth examination of selected contemporary societies focusing on their customs, language, values, key social institutions and stratification systems. The various internal and external forces affecting political, economic, religious and social cultural dynamics in different, distinct cultures are examined. Students explore the differing social relationships within the family and the community in selected societies. The course also provides a review of selected anthropological case studies from many world cultures.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or ANT107

Offered: Varies

Note: This course satasfies the Behavioral or Social Science General Education requirement.

3
ANT215
Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

This course is an overview of the cultures of the contemporary Middle East. Emphasis is placed on understanding the region’s cultural, social, political, and religious diversity. Popular and academic conceptions (and misconceptions) of the region are examined and a general history of the region is introduced in order to develop an anthropological perspective on the contemporary culture as observed in the villages, towns, cities, and nations of the region.

Prerequisite: ANT107 or SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
CRJ105
Criminology, Theory, and Practice

This course provides a general overview of the major theories of crime and criminal behavior, as well as the scope and nature of the criminal justice system and the problem of crime.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO117
Principles of Macroeconomics

This course is an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics including current economic problems, national income, employment, prices, monetary and fiscal policy to stabilize the economy. Emphasis is given to economic growth and the international economy.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO118
Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers principles of microeconomics including functioning of competitive and non-competitive markets, price and wage theory, labor and agricultural economics, income distribution, and comparative economic systems.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO155
Emerging Market Economies

This interdisciplinary, hands-on course is designed to provide students with the understanding of the workings of the economy and the financial markets. It acquaints students with the tools and concepts of finance and macroeconomics and the ability to apply them to study the stock markets in an emerging economy.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
ECO157
Global Ecomonics

This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary global economic issues, as well as economic tools necessary to analyze them. Primary focus of the course addresses international trade while emphasizing the importance and practical applicability of related issues in international finance and international relations in day-to-day life.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
GEO104
Geography: Culture & Environment

This course examines the differences and spatial interactions of various cultures, technologies, and regions. The economic and social possibilities of local, extra-local, and regional environments are viewed from the perspective of their resident human populations. The concept of a world region is introduced and used as framework by which to understand the contemporary issues associated with cultural geography. The basic concepts of cultural geography are introduced and the analytical tools of cultural geography are reviewed. The successful student is conversant with the basic tools and concepts of cultural geography, the analytical perspectives of the discipline, as well as the broad cultural patterns of the cultural regions of the world.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral & Social Sciences general education requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring

3
GOV101
Comparative Politics

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic concepts and themes in comparative politics. Using a case studies approach, the course compares and contrasts states according to political ideology, process, socialization, historical evolution, public policy, state institutions, and governmental systems.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
GOV102
International Relations

This course features an historical examination of the fundamentals of international relations in theory and practice. Topics pertaining to developed and developing nations, security, power, science and technology, and international organizations are discussed with emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.

Prerequisite: ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Offered: Spring

3
GOV111
American Government

This course provides an introductory examination of the federal government. Emphasis is placed upon the political system in both principle and practice, the structure of our government, and public safety.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS103
US History to 1865

This introductory survey of United States history from the European invasion of North America through the mid-19th Century period of the Civil War and Reconstruction addresses major social, cultural, political, and economic developments with emphasis on their relation to contemporary United States institutions and trends.

Prerequisite: None; ENL020 and ENL050 strongly recommended

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS104
US History since 1965

This introductory survey of United States history from Reconstruction to the present addresses major social, cultural, political, and economic developments with emphasis on their relation to contemporary United States institutions and trends.

Prerequisite: None; ENL020 and ENL050 strongly recommended

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS108
US History since 1945

This course is a contemporary history of the United States since World War II at home and abroad. It provides an in-depth investigation of the events, developments, personalities, and meanings of the changes of the past years.

Prerequisite: None; ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores strongly recommended

Offered: Fall, Spring

Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS119
World History I

This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from the rise of civilization to 1500 Current Era (CE) in Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania, the Middle East, and the Americas. The course highlights issues in geography, trade, religious and cultural movements, and social and political change that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS120
World History II

This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from 1500 Current Era (CE) to the present in Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania, the Middle East, and the Americas. The course highlights issues of geography, trade, religious and cultural movements, and social and political change that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS160
European History I

This course provides a general overview of major topics of European history from ancient times up to 1600 Current Era (CE). Students focus on cultural, religious, political, and economic developments that formed the basis of modern European culture and society and influenced the Americas and other regions.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS162
European History II

This course provides a general overview of European History from 1600 to the present. Students focus on cultural, religious, political, and economic developments that formed the basis of modern European culture and influenced the United States and other nations.

Prerequisites: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS201
History of China

The course is a historical study of China’s history and culture going back to the first Chinese dynasty through the Communist Revolution of 1949 and beyond. Students will examine the historical, economic, and social factors that developed Chinese civilization. The transformation of China from an Imperial State to a Communist Republic will be closely examined in order to gain a better appreciation of how contemporary Chinese view the world today, particularly the U.S. The course will also provide a foundation for the continued study of a broad range of Asian topics.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

3
HIS206
Ancient History

This survey course covers the development of the earliest civilizations of the Near East and Eurpoe, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, including their major historical periods: cultural contributions; and social, political, and economic organization.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS207
Medieval History

Students survey of the elements of medieval history from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the coming of the Renaissance. This course emphasizes the development of the medieval church, the growth of feudalism and the origins of its decline, and the seminal ideas which continue to affect our civilization.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS215
Women in US History

This course is a survey of the roles and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. The contributions of women to the development of the United States are examined with particular emphasis upon multiculturalism, legal status, economic opportunities, reproduction and family life.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS216
History of Japan

The course is an historical study of Japan’s history and culture from ancient times to the present. Students will examine the historical, economic, and social factors that developed Japanese civilization. The remarkable transformation of Japan from a feudal society led by an aristocratic class of samurai to a modern republic similar to modern 19th century Western nations will be closely analyzed. The course will also include close scrutiny of the events pushing Japan into WW II as well as Japan’s dynamic post- WW II recovery, to include a significant economic boom. The course will provide a foundation for the continued study of Japan as well as a broad range of Asian topics.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

3
HIS217
The Civil War

This course addresses a crucial era in United States history: the Civil War. The class covers three major areas of historical inquiry: a) the events that led up to the war including sectionalism and slavery; b) the war itself including an overview of military events, the political and economic impact of war, and the social history of war; and c) Reconstruction, the process by which the nation sought to rebuild after the war.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS227
History of the Middle East

This course explores the development and interactions of cultures in the region now referred to as the "Middle East" – Southwest Asia – and adjacent regions that today share many aspects of culture. The course covers the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, travels through the rise (and fall) of empires that spread through the region (such as the Persian, Islamic, Mongol, Ottoman and Safavid empires), explores the period of direct and indirect Western (European and American) intervention, the rise of fundamentalism and the Arab Spring.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a HIS100-level course

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Semester Offered: Spring

3
HIS228
Women in European History

This course explores women's real and perceived roles and status in society from Ancient Greece to modern times. The course focuses on women's roles in the development of European history. Students explore how history has impacted the lives of women of different social and cultural groups and how women have impacted history.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS241
Selected Topics in History

This course serves as a vehicle to either deepen students' knowledge of subjects addressed in History introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: Any introductory-level History course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HIS255
History of Vietnam

The course is a historical study of Vietnam with a specific focus on the U.S. involvement there during the Vietnam War. Students will study Vietnam’s history and culture going back to ancient times and develop an understanding of the significant impact that both had in the U.S. involvement there.

Prerequisites: ENL101 and a 100-level history course

Offered: Varies

3
HIS258
African American History

This survey course addresses African Americans in United States history, thought, and culture from slavery to the present. Topics addressed include slavery and emancipation, civil rights, religion, arts and literature, and gender.

Prerequisite: HIS103 or HIS104

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HUS101
Introduction to Human Services

This course is an introduction to the historical, political and social aspects of Human Services. Topics include themes and purposes of Human Services, theoretical orientations, history and evolution of the Human Services profession, skills and intervention strategies for generalist practice, the helping process, working within a system, child and family services, mental health, substance abuse and treatment. Also covered are professional concerns including ethical standards, decision making, confidentiality, and clients' rights.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
HUS201 The Helping Relationship: Human Services Delivery 3
PHI130
Introduction to Philosophy

This course provides the student with an introduction to six major issues in philosophy. Although the course is essentially an "isms" course, there is substantial and focused emphasis on historical development. In every section of the course, original source materials are read and used.

Prerequisite: None

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
PHI131
Logic

This course is an introduction to the principles of logic. It is designed for students who wish to develop their habits of thinking clearly and logically in the everyday world as well as in specialized areas such as science and technology. Although there will be some coverage of informal logic, the thrust of the course will be on formal logic including the following topics: deduction and syllogistic logic, symbolic logic, and induction and scientific method.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI160
Three Great Thinkers

Students in this course will engage in a critical examination of a number of contemporary seminal ideas central to the human experience of both Eastern and Western thinkers. Students will study the writings of three major thinkers in the history of ideas. The three will be announced before pre-registration each semester and will vary from semester to semester, so the course will never be the same. Students will explore the ideas in the course for internal consistency and for the historical contexts in which they arose, as well as the actual consequences those ideas have had in human affairs.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a previous philosophy course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI201
Existenialism

This course provides the student with a comprehensive analysis of the multifaceted view toward life which has come to be known as existentialism. Social, moral, legal, religious, literary, as well as epistemological and metaphysical aspects of the existentialistic point of view, are considered.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI210
Ethics

This course provides a rigorous and thorough examination of the major ethical theories in the history of Western philosophy, covering the work of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Hobbes, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Mill, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Ayer, and contemporary writers such as Callahan, Raz, Rawls, Nozick, and Frankl. The early part of the course is a study of metaethics and of the terminology used in doing ethical analysis. The body of the course involves the study of five major theories of normative ethics: natural law theories, social contract theories, duty-based (deontological) theories, utilitarian (teleological) theories, and existentialist theories. Skeptical alternatives to these theories will also be considered. In the last month of the semester, each student is expected to focus on a project dealing with a specific ethical theory or problem area.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Fall, Summer

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PSY101
General Psychology

Introduction to the major concepts and principles underlying human behavior and mental processes. Topics include personality theory, development, learning and thought, brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, stress and physical health, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and social psychology.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY201
Child Psychology

This course focuses on important aspects of physical, cognitive, social and emotional development, occurring from the prenatal period through middle childhood. The major theories of development, research methods and the important roles of genetics and neuroscience are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of early experiences and biological factors in the later formation of personality, intellectual, and emotional behaviors.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY202
Adolescent Psychology

Physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development of the human being during adolescence. Suggested for students planning to major in psychology, education, social work, or related areas.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY207
Abnormal Psychology

This course includes the study of the major psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. Analysis is made of the probable causes of these disorders with emphasis on the strengths and limitations of the commonly used therapies. Consideration is given to positive, constructive, alternative responses to the basic problems of living.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY208
Principles of Counseling & Crisis Intervention

Analysis of a variety of life crises, methods of effecting intervention, and procedures for establishing a counseling relationship when appropriate. Designed to introduce those now in, or preparing for, the helping professions or related paraprofessional positions, to the principles of effective crisis intervention and counseling.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY212
Human Sexuality

This course explores the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Sexuality is considered a vital part of the total human organism. Issues of psycho-sexual development, sexual physiology, sexual attitudes, gender identity, love and sex, sex and the law, sexual lifestyles, and sexual dysfunction, among others, are discussed in an open, frank manner. Audio/visual material, internet websites, and discussion forums augment the textbook and lecture content.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY219
Psychology of Women

This course is designed for both females and males wishing a broader understanding of the physiological, psychological, and sociological determinants of female growth and development. It concentrates on developmental issues and contemporary role expectations, conflicts, and the status of women within a culturally defined role throughout the life cycle.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY225
Social Psychology

In an ever-changing global society, the individual is both influenced by the groups they encounter and conversely they influence those same groups. Social Psychology addresses human interaction and its consequences. Topics include conformity, aggression, motivation, group organization, social influences on perception, cognitive processes, and culture's impact on social behavior, addressing issues of tolerance within an increasingly diverse society. Emphasis is on the application of concepts.

Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY233
Developmental Psychology: The Life Span

This course provides a survey of the physical, cognitive, sexual, social and moral issues relevant to human development across the life span.

Prerequisite: PSY101 and ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY235
Cognitive Psychology

This course defines and explains the major concepts and principles underlying Cognitive Psychology. Topics include the human information processing system, perception and attention, short-term memory, different aspects of long term memory, judgements, reasoning and problem solving.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
PSY241
Selected Topics in Psychology

This course serves as a vehicle to either deepen student's knowledge of subjects adressed in Psychology introductory courses or explore issues outside the traditional curriculum.

Prerequisite: PSY101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC106
Principles of Sociology

An introduction to basic social concepts, theoretical perspectives and research methods. Topics include societies, cultures, social organization, social inequalities, social institutions, group behavior and the impact of globalization, population growth, and new technologies upon individuals and societies.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
SOC205
Juvenile Delinquency

This course analyzes delinquent behavior of young people in our society, using various studies of the topic. It emphasizes the relationship between delinquent behavior and today's social and political conditions.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC208
Race, Gender, & Class in the US

This course examines the intertwining constructs of race, class, and gender, and their effects on the social and economic experiences of groups or persons. Through a focus on racial formation in U.S. history, students examine dominant ethnic identity and the histories of diverse ethnic groups. Students analyze how race, class, and gender shape individuals' personal identities and access to institutional settings. Ideologies and achievements of diverse ethnic groups are compared.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Offered: Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

3
SOC210
Marriage and Family

Study of the social aspects of family life and the impact of society upon families. Topics include historical forms of family life, varieties of contemporary families, the effects of changing cultural values and economic forces upon the daily life and stability of families, gender, the social psychology of love and romance, sex, parenting, and divorce. The course also covers family policy issues.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Offered: Fall

3
SOC215
Social Problems

A survey of the nature and range of social problems, the global and societal conditions which give rise to them, and the methods by which societies attempt to cope with them.

Prerequisite: SOC106

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral and Social Sciences general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
SOC230
Peoples and Cultures in Africa

The course examines Africa’s social, economic, political, religious and cultural institutions, as well as the origins, cultural practices, population dynamics, family structures, marriage, inheritances, values, ethnicity, gender relations and patriarchy, and inter-tribal and ethnic conflicts in modern Africa. Contemporary issues such as HIV/AIDS epidemic, poverty, and Africa’s place in the global world are examined.

Prerequisite: SOC106 or ANT107 or HIS119 or HIS120

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Behavioral & Social Sciences general education requirement.

3

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English Composition/Writing Credits
ENL101
English Composition I

ENL101 is an introductory college composition course required of all AA and AS-degree students and prerequisite to all other college-level English courses. It is designed to help students develop and express ideas clearly and effectively using standard American English through frequent writing and the study of rhetorical patterns of development. Students learn to write essays using a recognized scholarly documentation style.

Prerequisite: Appropriate scores in Reading Comprehension and in Sentence Skills on Computerized Placement Test or grade of C or better in ENL020 and ENL050 or ESL201

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies English Composition/Writing general education requirement

3
ENL102
English Composition II

A continuation of ENL101, this course is required of all Associate in Arts students and a prerequisite to all upper level English courses. It focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about literature and is designed to help students refine writing skills developed in ENL101.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C-" or higher in ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies either an English Composition/Writing or Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3

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Humanitites & Fine Arts Credits
ART100
Drawing I

Students apply various graphic approaches that may include drawing from still life, landscape, and human figure. Emphasis is on individual creative expression with the objective being the development of perception and understanding of natural phenomena and translation of this information to a two-dimensional surface. Examples of contemporary drawing are appraised in the context of diversity and cultural differences.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART101
Design I

Basic design elements including line, shape, color, texture, value, and composition and their integration on a two-dimensional surface are studied and applied. Students examine the nature and effect of color in its full utilization as a design element in conjunction with the interaction of positive and negative space, optical phenomena, and theories of harmony and visual dynamics. Cultural, ethical, and environmental influences on design from a global perspective will be understood.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART103
Painting I

This is an introductory course in painting, exploring a variety of approaches and painting media. A series of landscape, still life, and personal imagery paintings are investigated as both descriptive and imaginative forms of creative expression. The ethical, multicultural and international contributions of painting are evaluated.

Prerequisite: ART100 / 3 credits.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART109
Art Appreciation

This course provides an introduction to the visual arts made by cultures throughout the world from prehistory to the present. It includes European art as well as art from Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on how and why art is created, its nature, and the role it plays in society. By studying the fundamental principles, elements, techniques, styles, and vocabulary of art, students explore significant artistic creations ranging in character from the personal, to the political, and religious. Students are required to make an independent visit to a museum.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART125
History of Art: Stone Age to Gothic

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to the art of the western world from the magical creations of the Old Stone Age to the magnificent works of the Gothic era. Illustrated lectures deal with such topics as ideas guiding artistic creations, general stylistic trends, important methods, materials, and techniques used.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART134
History of Art: Renaissance to Modern

Students explor the art of the western world from the Renaissance to the Modern eras. Illustrated lectures cover general aesthetic trends, the life and work of key artists, ideas guiding their creations, the vocabulary of art, as well as important methods, materials, and techniques the artists have employed. Significant artistic creations ranging in character fromt e personal, to the political, and religious are examined. Students are required to makean independent visit to a museum.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies the Humanities & Fine Arts General Education requirement.

3
ART136
Three-Dimensional Design

This course is an introduction to the elements of visual language (line, shape, tone, texture, color, light, volume, negative space) in 3D form. Students solve 3D design problems by creating modeled and constructed forms both in relief and free-standing form. Historical references are made to support the development and understanding of the work. This course can inspire students to explore their creative expression in sculpture.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART170
Introduction to Computer Graphics  (Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign)

Students learn software, hardware, and operating system basics using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. This course introduces fundamental concepts and terminology for creating and editing basic electronic images. The student successfully utilize these applications in graphic design, publication design, and preparation of documents for the web.

Prerequisite: ENL010 & ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement

3
ART205
Illustration (Adobe Illustrator)

Illustration I (Adobe Illustrator) is a detailed exploration of a variety of drawing, painting and design concepts and techniques using Adobe Illustrator. Development of personal expression is addressed as students use various techniques to illustrate book, poster, periodical and editorial designs.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART207
Graphic Design I

Introduction to the field of graphic design, including typography, layout and general graphic techniques. The use of technology and computational skills are applied in studio projects to support creativity and proficiency in handling media and preparing graphic designs. Ethical principles and concepts in communication design are explored in multicultural and global contexts.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring

Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART209
Printmaking Techniques

The study and development of the fundamental elements of printmaking techniques using a variety of approaches to edition and unique printing. Students cover all aspects of plate preparation and printing.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ART214
Digital Imaging (Adobe Photoshop)

This introductory course covers Adobe Photoshop software and scanning techniques and their relationship to graphic design. Students learn from hands-on projects the features of Adobe Photoshop. Assignments are tailored to a wide variety of users from graphic designers, artists, photographers, and web page designers. From the first pixel to the finished picture, students gain imaging proficiency and a strong understanding of the program.

Prerequisite: ART170

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ASL101
American Sign Language I

An introductory-level course in American Sign Language intended to give an overview of both the language and the culture of the Deaf community. The course focuses on everyday interaction, frequently used signs, basic rules of grammar, and cultural features within the Deaf community.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores or permission of instructor

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ASL102
American Sign Language II

The continued study of American Sign Language with emphasis on increasing vocabulary usage both receptively and expressively. A detailed look into the grammar and structure of American Sign Language with continued exposure to Deaf culture.

Prerequisite: ASL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
COM103
Human Communication

This course fosters and improves competence in intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication situations. Students demonstrate skills necessary to communicate effectively through exercises and presentations that reflect practical, real-world situations. The purpose of the course is to improve the student's skill in communication by providing relevant knowledge and opportunity to apply that knowledge.

Prerequisite: ENL010 or ESL102 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

3
COM105
Survey of Mass Communication

This course explores the history, social impact, forms, and techniques of such media as newspapers, film, books, radio, television, and other expressions of mass culture. The aims of the course are to enable the student to better understand the new media-oriented environment in which we find ourselves and to explore various options available as a consumer of public information.

Prerequisite: ENL010 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM120
Introduction to Film

This course provides the student with an appreciation of the film experience. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theories, and genres which influenced the technical and aesthetic development of the medium. Concepts are illustrated through the viewing of classic American and international cinema. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall.

3
COM201
Interpersonal Communication

This course is designed to improve human relationships through an understanding of the principles of effective interpersonal communication. Students participate actively in listening, perceiving, interpreting words and meanings, conflict resolution, assertiveness, nonverbal awareness, developing trusting relationships, and considering the role of the self-concept.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM203
Public Speaking

A study of elements of public communication through various one-to-many speaking situations. Emphases includes communication theory, speaker-audience relationships, speaker resources, speech construction and delivery.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM204
Persuasive Communication

A study of the process of persuasion, focusing on the formation of beliefs, attitudes and values, fundamentals of attitude change, audience analysis, the persuasive message, effects of channel and setting, and source credibility. Opportunities are offered for classroom application of the principles and theory discussed.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Spring

3
COM207
Argumentation and Debate

This class provides an overview of the study of argumentation. Students learn argumentation theories and approaches while gaining skills in critical thinking and public speaking. By the end of the semester, students understand how to research and build an argument; how to anticipate, construct, and refute arguments; and how to evaluate the political, moral, and cultural contexts of argumentation.

Prerequisite: COM103 or ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
COM221
American Film

This course provides the student with an appreciation of the film experience through a survey of American film from historical, aesthetic, economic, technological, critical, and appreciative viewpoints. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theories, and genres. Concepts are illustrated through viewing classic American cinema. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring.

3
COM222
International Cinema

This course is a survey of the development of international cinema from historical, aesthetic, economic, technological, critical, and appreciative viewpoints. Particular attention is given to important techniques, theiries, and genres. (4 class hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Spring

3
DAN120
Modern Dance Techniques

This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of modern dance techniques and composition. Participation in dance exercises, observation, and discussion of various modern dance styles enables students to develop a physical awareness and understanding of modern dance. Emphasis is placed on participation.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring

3
ENL102
English Composition II

A continuation of ENL101, this course is required of all Associate in Arts students and a prerequisite to all upper level English courses. It focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about literature and is designed to help students refine writing skills developed in ENL101.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C-" or higher in ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies either an English Composition/Writing or Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL108
Critical Reading and Thinking

This course guides students enhance their comprehension of written, spoken, and visual information by improving their critical thinking abilities. Through practicing habits of mind to strengthen analytical and reasoning skills, students learn to form well-supported arguments, draw thoughtful conclusions, make responsible decisions, and transfer acquired skills to their academic, professional, and personal life.

Prerequisite: ENL020 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL120
Introduction to Children's Literature

Students survey works drawn from the rich variety of children's literature. They analyze selections from major genres, discuss historical and contemporary issues, and develop practical ways of involving children in literature.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL131
Technical Writing

This course introduces students to technical and professional writing within a career setting. Students learn to write reports, instructions, summaries, e-mails, and memos using content and language appropriate to the reader. Students use technology tools to create document layout and design, and to report, interpret and organize statistical information and data.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL135
Short Stories & Human Values

This course examines the ways in which short fiction reflects and shapes the human experience. Works examined feature a variety of cultural traditions, allowing students to consider which human values are universal and which may be culturally bound. Students examine the ways in which stories are used to preserve and challenge social institutions such as marriage/family, education, justice, and religion.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Spring.

Note: Satasfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL150
World Mythologies

Students study myths from the great cultures of the world. Through readings, discussions, research projects and presentations, students explore the universal values conveyed by these stories from different world cultures. Students discover the symbolism in the events and details of these stories, and they understand mythmaking as a primary human activity.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL161
Journalism I

This course is designed to instruct the student in the collecting, writing, editing and publishing of news and feature articles in periodicals. Although weekly lecture and discussion periods will be mandatory, the emphasis in the course will be on writing news stories outside of regular class time. Each student in the course is expected to be involved in the student newspaper.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL201
World Literature I

Major literary works are studied from the ancient world through the Enlightenment that have both described and shaped western civilization.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/odd

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL202
World Literature II

Through reading Chinese folktales, Ottoman Empire traditional stories, and European treatises from the Enlightenment, students explore the literary sources of our diverse modern world cultures. An examination of historical texts from revolution to romanticism in western Europe and the Americas, lyric poetry of the Urdu, as well as multiple voices of myriad peoples, provides a framework for studying and comparing universal values through twentieth century texts.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL203
British Literature through the 18th Century

Designed for students who have successfully completed both semesters of English Composition and who wish to become familiar with literature that has helped shape contemporary culture. This course surveys representative works and writers in English literature through the 18th century.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL204
British Literature from the Romantic Age to the Present

Designed for students who have successfully completed both semesters of English Composition and who wish to become familiar with literature that helped shape contemporary culture, this survey course examines representative works and wirters in British literature since the mid-eighteenth century.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring (odd numbered years)

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL205
American Literature to 1890

Students examine major contributions to the development of American culture and ideals from the Pilgrims to Henry James.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL206
American Literature since 1890

Students examine the rise of Realism and Naturalism through fiction and poetry.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL210
Exploring Modern Poetry

Students engage in reading, discussing, and writing about poems and poets of the 20th and 21st centuries. Consideration of modern poetry as both literature and art includes individual projects and presentations. Selections are drawn from both major as well as lesser known and culturally diverse poetic voices.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL215
World Religions in Literature

World Religions in Literature provides students the opportunity to read, discuss and write about the religions of the world as subthemes in short stories, poetry, novels and literary essays. Included is intensive reading, analysis of world literature and its influence on its society, consideration of literary criticisms, and discussion of values/beliefs evident in literature with particular attention to religious themes.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/odd

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL217
Exploring the World of Science Fiction

Exploring the World of Science Fiction is a course that provides students the opportunity to read, discuss, and write about the genre of science fiction in literature. Texts include short stories, poetry, novels, film, and nonfiction. Emphasis is given to reading and analysis of the genre of science fiction and its influence on society and literature.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Spring/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL219
Masters of Horror

Masters of Horror is a literature course that provides students the opportunity to read, discuss and write about the genre of horror in literature. Texts include short stories, poetry, novels, film, and nonfiction. Emphasis is given to reading and analysis of the genre of horror and its influence on society and literature.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
ENL228
Women Writers

This course examines traditions and themes especially important in the development of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama written by women, such as "Women Alone," "Women and Sexuality," "Women and Work," "Women and War," "Women in Love." An initial overview describing the emergence of women as authors is provided to establish topical and historical contexts. Readings, drawn primarily from moderm texts, offer a diverse range of authors, genres, styles, and cultures.

Prerequisite: ENL102

Offered: Fall/even

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
FRN101
Elementary French I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary French sequence for beginning students of French. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken French. This course is not intended for students whose native language is French.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN102
Elementary French II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college elementary French sequence. It is for beginning students of French. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken French. The purpose of this course is to provide students a sound basis for learning French as it is spoken and written today. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: FRN101 or permission of the instructor

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN201
Intermediate French I

This course is for students who have completed one year of Elementary French or two years of high school French. Students will read, discuss, and write about francophone culture and language in French.

Prerequisite: FRN102 or 2–4 years of high school French

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
FRN202
Intermediate French II

Intermediate French II is for students who have completed Intermediate French I or three to four years of high school French. Students will read, discuss and write about francophone culture and language in French. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: FRN201 or 3–4 years of high school French

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER101
Elementary German I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary German sequence for beginning students of German. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four-skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken German. This course is not intended for students whose native language is German.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER102
Elementary German II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college Elementary German sequence. It is for beginning students of German. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken German.

Prerequisite: GER101

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER201
Intermediate German I

This course is for students who have completed one year of elementary college German or two to four years of high school German. Students will read, discuss, and write about German culture and language in German.

Prerequisite: GER102 or 2–4 years of high school German

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
GER202
Intermediate German II

This course is for students who have completed Intermediate German I or three to four years of high school German. Students will read, discuss and write about Germanic culture and language in German. Students must have college level-reading and writing skills in their native language. Students are expected to be able to greet and respond to greeting and introductions, engage in conversation, express likes, dislikes and needs, describe and compare, narrate a short anecdote using past, present, and future tenses, write simple paragraphs, and read and understand some details and important ideas in authentic texts.

Prerequisite: GER201

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
HUM102
Humanities: Perception through the Arts

This course is an introduction to humanistic studies; it examines works of the human spirit (in music, painting, philosophy, sculpture, architecture, drama, poetry) which have influenced our civilization and who we are as individuals.

Prerequisite: ENL101

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS100
Music Appreciation

A survey of development of music from the Renaissance to the present including jazz and the contemporary scene. Emphasis on basic musical materials and principles of design. For students not planning to major in music; no previous musical training required.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS101
Music Theory I

This course examines the fundamental materials including pitch, rhythm, tonal systems, ear training, and basic harmony for those wishing to learn or to improve music reading skills. Students practice in performance and composition for instruments and voice.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS102
Music History I

This course is a detailed study of styles and forms of music from ancient cultures to eighteenth-century classicism. Major compositions, personalities, styles, and forms are explored through structured listening, analysis, and reading assignments.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS103
Music History II

This course is a detailed study of styles and forms of music from the eighteenth-century to the present. Major compositions, personalities, styles, and forms are explored through structured listening, analysis, and reading assignments.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS116
History of Rock Music

This course explores the origins, characteristics and stylistic development of rock music. The emphasis is on the artists, songwriters, and producers who have created the most famous hits and long term trends.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
MUS202
Music Theory II

This course is a continuation of MUS101 with emphasis on harmony and form.

Prerequisite: MUS101

Semester Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
PHI131
Logic

This course is an introduction to the principles of logic. It is designed for students who wish to develop their habits of thinking clearly and logically in the everyday world as well as in specialized areas such as science and technology. Although there will be some coverage of informal logic, the thrust of the course will be on formal logic including the following topics: deduction and syllogistic logic, symbolic logic, and induction and scientific method.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI160
Three Great Thinkers

Students in this course will engage in a critical examination of a number of contemporary seminal ideas central to the human experience of both Eastern and Western thinkers. Students will study the writings of three major thinkers in the history of ideas. The three will be announced before pre-registration each semester and will vary from semester to semester, so the course will never be the same. Students will explore the ideas in the course for internal consistency and for the historical contexts in which they arose, as well as the actual consequences those ideas have had in human affairs.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a previous philosophy course

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI201
Existentialism

This course provides the student with a comprehensive analysis of the multifaceted view toward life which has come to be known as existentialism. Social, moral, legal, religious, literary, as well as epistemological and metaphysical aspects of the existentialistic point of view, are considered.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
PHI210
Ethics

This course provides a rigorous and thorough examination of the major ethical theories in the history of Western philosophy, covering the work of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Hobbes, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Mill, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Ayer, and contemporary writers such as Callahan, Raz, Rawls, Nozick, and Frankl. The early part of the course is a study of metaethics and of the terminology used in doing ethical analysis. The body of the course involves the study of five major theories of normative ethics: natural law theories, social contract theories, duty-based (deontological) theories, utilitarian (teleological) theories, and existentialist theories. Skeptical alternatives to these theories will also be considered. In the last month of the semester, each student is expected to focus on a project dealing with a specific ethical theory or problem area.

Prerequisite: ENL101 or PHI130

Offered: Fall, Summer

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts (or) Behavioral or Social Science general education requirement.

3
SPN101
Elementary Spanish I

The first semester of a two-semester college elementary Spanish sequence for beginning non-native students of Spanish. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken Spanish. This course is not intended for students whose native language is Spanish.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN102
Elementary Spanish II

This is the second semester of a two-semester college Elementary Spanish sequence. It is for beginning students of Spanish. The text and ancillary materials provide a thorough four skills approach: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding spoken Spanish. (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: SPN101

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN105
Elementary Spanish I for Health Care Professionals

This is a one semester college Elementary Spanish course with focused instruction in Spanish language, culture, and health issues of relevance to health professionals working with Spanish speaking populations. The text and ancillary materials provide development of the four skills: speaking, reading, writing, and understanding Spanish.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN201
Intermediate Spanish I

This course is for students who have completed one year of elementary college Spanish or three to four years of high school Spanish. Students read, discuss, and write about Hispanic culture and language in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPN102 or 3–4 years of high school Spanish

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
SPN202
Intermediate Spanish II

This is the second semester of the sequential intermediate college-level Spanish emphasizing further mastery of speaking, understanding, reading and writing Spanish. Readings include historical and literary aspects of the Hispanic world and Spain. This course completes Stage III of the Language Learning Continuum of the ACTFL (American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages). (5 class hours)

Prerequisite: SPN201 or 5 years of high school Spanish

Offered: Spring

Satisfies a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

4
THR101
Introduction to Theater

This course explores the many facets that make up the experience of theater. Students probe questions like: what is the essence of theater, who are the artists that create what one sees on stage, what are the types of drama, the trends, and movements since the Ancient Greeks, and how are plays reflective of playwrights' cultures? Students broaden their knowledge and experience of what constitutes the art of theater through reading, class discussion, lecture, staged readings, and viewing live and video performances.

Prerequisite: ENL010 and ENL040 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts general education requirement.

3
THR113
Rehearsal & Performance

Rehearsal and Performance is a practicum course that invites students to participate in the multifaceted experience of interpreting a play into a live theatre production. Students will learn by doing, with the option of assuming responsibilities as performers and/or production crewmembers in the Department's scheduled production.

Prerequisite: None

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisifes a Humanities & Fine Arts general education requirement.

3

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Interdisciplinary Studies Credits
BIO204
Introduction to Public Health

This course provides an introduction to the public health. Its biomedical basis, including infectious and non-infectious diseases, environmental pollutants, and related factors are discussed. Other topics covered include social, behavioral, and environmental factors that affect public health, Federal, state and international health agencies. Epidemiological principles, surveillance and regulation are addressed with analysis of case studies. Emerging diseases, biotechnology, and new investigative tools are also introduced.

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score, ENL101, and a 4-credit science course with lab component

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
BIT103
Medical Terminology

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed yet no previous knowledge of these topics is necessary.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic assessment skills

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
BIT175
Visual Basic Programming

Students learn the design processes and development tools available in Visual Basic using the .NET Framework. This knowledge is applied to build and execute Windows-based applications. Screen design, process controls and software interfacing are covered in addition to Visual Basic syntax.

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and GIT110

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
COL101
The College Experience

This theme-based seminar is designed to help students develop the skills and confidence necessary to succeed in college, the world of work, and life. In this course, students will examine theories and practices associated with academic success. Areas of study include education and career planning, study skills, effective communication, critical and creative thinking, information literacy, personal management, development of community and awareness of diversity, technology, and leadership. Modeled on the "workshop format" in which students learn by doing, students will be actively engaged in group activities and team projects.

Prerequisite: ENL010

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3
COM216
HRM216
Event Planning and Management
Event Planning and Management

HRM216 Event Planning and Management

This course offers an introduction to the researching, planning, coordinating, marketing, management, implementation, and evaluation of special events. Through the study of relevant communication and management theory, as well as practical hands on experience, students will learn about the wide range of components that go into the execution of events of all sizes. Specific areas of study include food and beverage service, laws and permits, security, advertising and promotion, and logistics. Students may not earn credit for COM216.

Prerequisites: (COM103 or COM202) or (CUL150 or HRM140)

Note: Satisfies a General Education Elective.

Offered: Varies

3
ENR101
Intro to Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing

Students are introduced to the world of engineering and manufacturing through activities that showcase how products are designed and built. Teams design, build, and test a weight-bearing structure, as-well-as reverse engineer a product to improve its design. Classroom and laboratory exercises are designed to expose the student to the different engineering and advanced manufacturing disciplines. Lab sessions provide hands-on exposure to the concepts discussed in the lecture sessions. This course does not require any prior engineering background.

Prerequisite: ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

4
ENR102
3D Mechanical Design I

This is an introductory course for students interested in exploring careers as engineers, architects, and designers. Principles associated with 3D design, visualization, documentation, and product simulation are taught through hands-on use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling software. In addition, student designed parts are fabricated in a 3D printer to enhance the understanding of the design to manufacturing process. (3 class hours/2 lab hours).

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

4
ENR103
Introduction to Robotics

Students work in teams to design, build, program, and test increasingly complex electro-mechanical robots. The course teaches how robots move (locomotion and kinematics), how they sense (perception), and how they reason about their environment (planning). Lecture information is tied to lab experiments and sessions. Students are exposed to robotics related career options in the manufacturing, service, and medical industries. This course does not require any prior engineering background. (3 class hours/2 lab hours).

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

4
GIT110
Microcomputer Applications Software

This course focuses on the use of the microcomputer in various business settings. A lab/lecture environment is used to enable students to learn the Windows operating system and four commonly used software packages selected from applications in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. Students are introduced to the software and then progress through various challenging assignments, including integrating applications. Basic concepts in Internet usage, including electronic mail, are an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: ENL020 & ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score and (GIT101, GIT102, or 30wpm)

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a General Education elective.

3

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Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Credits
MAT121
Math for Elementary & Early Childhood Educators

This course is designed for students planning to teach Elementary and/or Early Childhood Education. Students develop an understanding of the mathematical content of geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability at the deep level required for successful early childhood and elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary and early childhood educators. Topics include: Two- and three-dimensional Geometry; Measurement; Data Analysis; Single Variable Statistics; Probability. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT120

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT140
Survey of Mathematics

Designed for liberal arts students. Emphasis is on mathematics as the study of patterns and on mathematical thinking as the making and proving of conjectures. Topics: logic, number sequences, functions and graphs, large numbers and logarithms, geometry, symmetry and regular figures, methods of counting, probability, introductory statistics, finance, and topology. The history, philosophy, and applications of mathematics are interwoven. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT150
Elementary Statistics

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics that emphasizes statistical literacy and conceptual understanding. Topics include: techniques for organizing and presenting data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, one-sample hypothesis tests, and correlation and regression. (4 contact hours).

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT165
Finite Math

An introduction to selected applications of mathematics in business, management, social sciences, and economics. Topics include: descriptive statistics, graphing of functions, simple and compound interest, functions and their applications, probability and elements of mathematical modeling using first and second degree polynomials. The course is designed for students in career programs. (4 contact hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT035 or MAT040) or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

3
MAT175
College Algebra

This is an entry-level mathematics course for students interested in a STEM track. Topics include: domain and range, piecewise functions, complex numbers, quadratic inequalities, graphs of polynomial and rational functions, fundamental theorem of algebra, transformations of graphs, inverse functions, solving exponential and logarithmic equations, Gaussian elimination, and translations of conics. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are emphasized throughout the course. This course prepares students for Precalculus with Trigonometry or Applied Calculus. (5 contact hours)

Prerequisite: MAT045 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Semesters offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

4
MAT220
Discrete Mathematics & Introduction to Proofs

This introductory course is designed for prospective mathematics and computer science majors. It covers basic techniques of mathematical proof and reasoning, with an emphasis on discrete structures as well as concepts widely used in computing. Topics include set theory, functions, relations, proposition logic, methods of proof, mathematical induction, recursion, and Boolean algebra. Additional topics in discrete mathematics will be selected from number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and finite state automata.

Prerequisites: MAT180 or MAT195 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning general education requirement.

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Natural or Physical Science Credits
AST101
Fundamentals of Astronomy

A one-semester science course, with laboratory, that provides an introduction to the principles and theories of contemporary astronomy within and beyond the solar system. The course traces the pathways of observation, conjecture, thought, investigation and discovery to demonstrate how scientific inquiry has enabled the human mind to attain an unprecedented insight to the nature of the universe. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO105
Survey of Human Anatomy & Physiology

This is an introductory course of human anatomy and physiology. The course starts with anatomical terms and basic cellular biology and then emphasizes the structure and function of several organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course involves the examination of slides, bones, models, and the dissection of a rat. (This course does not meet the Nursing and Dental Hygiene program requirements for Anatomy and Physiology.) (3 class hours / 2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO109
Survey of Biology

This is a survey course of biology, the study of life, in one semester. It is designed to conceptually and experimentally explore the processes that sustain life. Major topics include cell biology, adaptation and evolution, genetics and reproduction, ecology and diversity, taxonomy and classification. The course is not intended for science majors.

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO151
General Biology I

This first course in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students is designed to acquaint the student with foundational principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function. Topics covered will include the basic chemical properties of living things, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression and Mendelian genetics. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisites: MAT045, ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO152
General Biology II

The second in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. It is designed to acquaint the student with the evolution and diversity of life as well as general ecological principles. Prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotes, plants, fungi and animals are studied. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. Microscopy, dissection, and some field work provide the basis for learning. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in BIO101 or BIO151

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO161
The Microbial World

An introduction to microorganisms and the roles they play in our environment and our bodies, for non-science majors. The topics covered include the different types of microbes, their cell structure, function, ecology, physiology and genetics. An introduction will be given to applied microbiology including the fields of agricultural, food, industrial and medical microbiology and of microbial ecology. The laboratory component introduces basic skills of viewing, handling, isolating, growing, and identifying microorganisms. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: ENL101 and MAT035

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO205
General Ecology

The lecture portion of this course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of ecology including the interactions of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Students will be introduced to the techniques of ecological data gathering and analysis. The laboratory exposes students to the field techniques used in investigating different ecological communities, specifically of Cape Cod, and emphasizes team-based research. One Saturday field trip is required for the laboratory component. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours per week)

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a grade of C or higher in BIO151 or ENV118

Offered: Fall

Note: Satisfies Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO210
Bird Biology

This is an introduction to the biology of birds and their behavior. Special emphasis is given to species of the United States and Massachusetts. A wide range of topics is presented, including field identification by sight and sound; taxonomy; breeding biology; foraging ecology; feather structure; flight; migration and orientation; anatomy and physiology. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours per week).

Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in BIO151 or ENV118 or permission of instructor.

Offered: Varies

Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
BIO241
Cell Biology (formerly BIO202)

This course provides an introduction to cell structure, function, and physiology. Topics include the function of cellular organelles, enzymes and their role in metabolism and regulation, synthesis of macromolecules, and gene expression and regulation.

Prerequisite: ENL101 and a grade of C or higher in BIO151 or ENV118

Offered: Fall

4
BIO251
Human Anatomy & Physiology I

A comprehensive systematic study of the human body emphasizing the structure and function of the systems. Part I topics include: cells and tissues, chemistry review, metabolism, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and reproductive systems and metabolism with correlated laboratory work. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours).

Prerequisites: MAT045, ENL020 and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM106
Survey of Chemistry

Presents the fundamentals of chemistry that are integral to an understanding of physical and biological processes. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between these processes and contemporary environmental topics. For non-science majors. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM109
Chemistry for the Health Sciences

An introductory course for students in various health-related programs. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of inorganic chemistry. Some organic chemistry is introduced. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM151
General Chemistry I

This course emphasizes the atomic nature of matter, fundamental laws and theories of mass and energy, the periodic classification of elements, chemical bonding, nomenclature, kinetic molecular theory applied to solids, liquids and gases, solution chemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Laboratory studies reinforce the principles and concepts studied in lecture and will initiate the student to sound methods of scientific investigation. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT040 or MAT045), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
CHM152
General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHM151. Considers the study of chemical families, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, solubility products, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Laboratory studies reinforce the principles and concepts studied in lecture and include the qualitative analysis of metals. (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHM101 or CHM151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
ENV118
Introduction to Environmental Science

A study of environmental interactions and the impact of humans on the environment. The use of natural resources, including land, air, water, mineral and biological resources, is examined. Local and global examples are presented to enable students to better understand and evaluate contemporary environmental problems and the application of science to their solution. The corresponding laboratory component provides students with the practical experience of measuring, recording and interpreting environmental data. Interdisciplinary knowledge is used to understand environmental problems. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
ESC101
Introduction to Earth Science

This is a one-semester, liberal arts and sciences course with a laboratory, designed to introduce the concept that planet Earth represents a dynamic, integrated system. The nature and characteristics of the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere are considered. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
ESC105
Fundamentals of Oceanography

A general introduction to the scientific study of the ocean environment including the physical, chemical, geological and biological properties of the sea. Some field trips may be required. This course is intended for non-science majors. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment score

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

4
HOR101
Plant & Soil Science

This course provides an in-depth introduction to plant classification, anatomy, physiology, nutrition and reproduction. Chemical and physical properties of soil as well as the relationship between soils and plant growth are emphasized. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT020 or MAT025), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Spring.

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY106
Survey of Physics

Classical and modern physics presented conceptually and experimentally for students desirng a one-semester introduction to physics. The class emphasizes verbal and conceptual understanding of the way the world works using as little mathematics as possible. This course is appropriate for non-science majors and as a preparation for PHY211. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT030 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY151
Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for any student interested in science and particularly appropriate for health sciences and pre-professional students. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: (MAT040 or MAT110 or MAT035), ENL020, and ENL050 or satisfactory basic skills assessment scores

Offered: Fall, Summer

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY152
Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to college physics without calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; light and optics, and some modern physics. The course is appropriate for non-science majors who are interested in science. (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY101 pr PHY151

Offered: Spring

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY211
University Physics I

First semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics and statics), relativity and some heat. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used. Previous experience in physics (such as PHY106) is strongly recommended. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT240, Calculus I. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: MAT195; Co-requisite: MAT240

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

4
PHY212
University of Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester introduction to university physics using calculus. This course covers vibrations and waves; electricity and magnetism; optics; and a brief introduction to modern physics. The course is appropriate for math, science, and engineering students. Calculus will be used throughout the course. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in MAT250, Calculus II. (3 lecture hours/2 laboratory hours/1 recitation hour)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PHY211

Offered: Varies

Note: Satisfies a Natural or Physical Science general education requirement.

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Note: 100-level courses are generally designed for first-year students; 200-level courses are generally designed for second-year students.