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The Black Experience

Forward Together, our Imagination, Determination, and Grit will see us through Anything.

The Black Experience
The Black Experience

Join and be heard as we explore the Black Experience through virtual presentations and discussions.

Black Futures: February 23-March 12

Tuesday, February 23 | 2pm-3pm

Powerful Voices in Storytelling: Master Theater 360
Spoken Word by Shasparay

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/98274935920

What Shasparay will teach you is that she can weave words to sound like music. Even the smalls ones, the monosyllables — the ifs, ands, buts, whats. She will share her storytelling using magically beautiful lyrical flow. Founder and Artistic Director Shasparay Lighteard is a performing artist from Austin, Texas, currently the 10th Ranked Poet in the World. She graduated with a B.A. in Theatre and African American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; she is a First Wave Urban Arts Full Scholarship recipient. While a high school student, she was a speaker at the 2016 TEDxYouth Austin conference. She will perform with an invited guest from her performance project.

Wednesday, March 3 | 2pm-3pm

Powerful Voices in Storytelling: Master Theater 360
Spoken Word by Shasparay

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/94557046736

What Shasparay will teach you is, she can weave words to sound like music. Even the smallest ones, the monosyllables — the ifs, ands, buts, whats. She will share her storytelling using magically beautiful lyrical flow.  This session will focus on a Black women’s value and worth.

Founder and Artistic Director Shasparay Lighteard is a performing artist from Austin, Texas, currently the10th Ranked Poet in the World.

Monday, March 8 | 2pm-3pm 

The Challenges of the Single Story
From Negro to Black to African American, now BIPOC?

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/97040949219

Our lives, our cultures, are delicately composed of many overlapping original stories.  Following in the footsteps of Novelist Chimamanda Adichie who shares how she found her authentic cultural voice.  A well-known local academician will visit virtually warning us and teaching us through their story that if we hear the “single” story about another person or country, we risk critical misunderstanding and bias.

Tuesday, March 9 | 2-3pm

My Hair is on Fire

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/98469411790

Anti-black hair sentiment in the U.S. has existed for centuries. In the 1700s, enslaved women who worked in the fields usually covered their hair in head-rags due to their work's harsh demands. Enslaved Africans who worked in the "big house," however, sometimes mimicked their enslavers' hairstyles, either by wearing wigs that had become popular during that era or shaping their curly coils to emulate them. Hear from professional stylist’ and historians discuss the identity politics hidden behind the use of harsh hair treatments leaving many women of color permanently damaged. Find out how the CROWN ACT plays a decisive role in prohibiting race-based hair discrimination. 

Wednesday, March 10 | 2-3pm

Remembering the Jim Crow Brand of Fear
Renika Montgomery-Tamiko & Guest

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/98110420816

The legal efforts to protect the rights of African Americans under Reconstruction was largely crushed by a series of oppressive laws and tactics called Jim Crow and Black Codes.  Listen to a historian connect the past to the present reapplication of Jim Crow.

Thursday, March 11 | 2-3pm

The History of Black Cinema; A signpost and a reflection of the society we live in
Asher Hamilton

Zoom link: https://capecod.zoom.us/j/97608709738

Film serves as a visual art of storytelling.  American cinema is over 125 years old and the Black Experience has been intwined within it from the beginning.  The stories told about

African Americans have been fraught with bias and bigotry yet there has always been a voice that has fought to craft a positive image of the Black Experience.  Hear from a film connoisseur and historian about the historical development of black movies.

The Black Experience

In response to a national push to expand the naming of "Black History Month" to one that is inclusive of the Black Family and Community's diasporic experiences, we are naming this month of February 2021.

The Black Experience: Forward together, our imagination, determination, and grit will see us through anything.

We are taking a needed response in recognizing a commitment to equity and justice as we collectively move forward addressing and understanding the need for language that demonstrates becoming more inclusive and speaking out to and for our under-represented faculty, staff, and students.

Taking a progressive look, we are going beyond checking the box for heritage month campus activities. Although not perfect, we attempt to disrupt group think of what has represented Black identity and interject the voices of many and various Black identities.

Expanding the name means looking beyond what's easy or comfortable and looking towards the radical, bold, and new future we can imagine for our students. To get there, it means challenging what has been offered in previous celebrations

Library References for The Black Experience can be found at: https://capecod.libguides.com/blackexperience

Contact Student Engagement

Student Engagement
Contact Asher Hamilton, Coordinator
E-mail ahamilton@capecod.edu